QUIZ: Test your general knowledge on traditional Arab dress

Once it comes to traditional dress across the world, the Middle East is considered unique and colorful.

Although the Arab world is a complex reality where local traditions and western fashions mix, there remains to be a strong sense of tradition in the region’s garments.

Not only do these traditional garments vary across Arab countries, they also represent a fundamental element in understanding the cultural identity and spirit of each Arab nation.

This quiz highlights some of the many interesting traditional clothes that exist.

[Source”timesofindia”]

Stand-alone Call of Duty: Modern Warfare Remastered could go on sale next week

Call of Duty: Modern Warfare Remastered, the remake of the 2007 classic that came bundled with last year’s Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare, may be getting a stand-alone version. A call to Target puts the the current street date for the unannounced title at June 27.

The story began yesterday over on Charlie Intel. It received a tip in the form of pictures showing a shrink-wrapped version of Modern Warfare Remastered for PlayStation 4 as well as an image of a Target shelf tag listing the price as $39.99. Later that day, a reader sent in a picture of the Target computer system listing the game’s street date as June 20.

Polygon called several Targets in the Chicagoland area for more information. Several employees confirmed that they had a listing for a product that matched the SKU given to Charlie Intel. They could confirm that it was a video game, and that the street date was June 27. However, all other information on the product listing was redacted. One employee said this is common practice internally at Target for new titles entering the computer system prior to their street date.

Polygon has reached out to Activision for more information.

Last year’s Infinite Warfare didn’t achieve the kind of success at retail that Activision had hoped for. Fan reaction to the game, which took the series to outer space in the far future, was extremely negative when the first trailer was released on YouTube. Later, Activision admitted that the game “underperformed” and that the setting “just didn’t resonate” with players.

Modern Warfare Remastered has seen continued support from Activision, including new character models and new weapons.

The next Call of Duty title is called Call of Duty: WWII and will tell the story of the U.S. Army’s 1st Infantry Division. We had hands-on the game’s multiplayer mode at this year’s E3. The title is expected to be released on November 3 for PlayStation 4, Windows PC and Xbox One.

 [Source”timesofindia”]

Upgrade your large kitchen appliances for less than $2,500

Take a look at your kitchen appliances. Maybe you inherited them from the last person who lived in your house or apartment. Maybe they’re mismatched or decades old, or not even working. It’s time to treat yourself to some upgrades.

Even if you’re on a tight budget, you can find a suite of large appliances for less than $2,500 that will keep your kitchen running without emptying your savings account. Be prepared to sacrifice, though — certain features are unavailable on appliances in this price range. For example, French doors and bottom-freezer fridges, slide-in stoves and induction cooktops, and dishwashers with adjustable racks are all products that could set you back $1,000 each.

Here are refrigerators, ovens and dishwashers that work well and will keep your upgrade total less than $2,500.

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Refrigerators

You’ll save some money if you opt for a fridge that has the freezer on top rather than a side-by-side or French-door model.

The GE GTE18GMHES comes in a fingerprint-resistant slate finish.

Tyler Lizenby/CNET

GE GTE18GMHES, $585

This is a basic fridge that looks good, thanks to a fingerprint-resistant slate finish. It’s also reliable when it comes to keeping your food cold. And you can find this refrigerator for as low as $585, which makes it even more appealing for your kitchen upgrade.

The LG LTCS24223S has a lot of storage space for a budget-friendly price.

Tyler Lizenby/CNET

LG LTCS24223S, $895

This refrigerator has plenty of room for your favorite foods: With 24 cubic feet of total storage space, the LG LTCS24223S is as big as top freezers get, with even more room for groceries than some French-door models.

Stoves

Freestanding stoves with the control panel on the back of the unit are the best value. You can put these models anywhere in your kitchen, which is great if you’re not planning a big renovation soon.

The Samsung NE59J630SB electric range includes a healthy selection of useful cooking modes.

Tyler Lizenby/CNET

Samsung NE59J630SB, $700

This electric range with a smooth cooktop has plenty of useful cooking modes and fast performance times, which makes this appliance a good value.

The GE JGB700SEJSS gas range does a fine job of cooking food and it does it consistently.

Chris Monroe/CNET

GE JGB700SEJSS, $700

This gas range is consistent when it comes to cooking food well, whether you’re baking or broiling, or just boiling water. It’s also easy to use

 

[Source”GSmerena”]

Report: 94-hour workweek required at minimum wage to afford 2-bedroom apartment in Utah

Larry Darden poses for a portrait in his home at the Lowell Apartments in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, June 14, 2017. Darden, who has been in his current apartment for a year and a half, had issues previously with finding affordable housing and suffered from unsafe living conditions.

SALT LAKE CITY — Before Larry Darden moved out in early 2016, he “was afraid to go to sleep at night” in his downtown Salt Lake apartment.

Roaches infested the place. There were attempted break-ins. Darden never felt comfortable or secure.

“It was very, very unsafe at my last address,” Darden says.

Despite the deplorable conditions, Darden was hundreds of dollars per month short of being able to consistently afford his apartment.

But after his applications for a place elsewhere were met with repeated rejections due to his prior criminal record, Darden was given a lifeline. He was able to get in at the Lowell Apartments, a low-income affordable housing complex at 233 E. 700 South managed by the Utah Nonprofit Housing Corp.

“Once I moved from there into here, it was like moving into paradise,” Darden told the Deseret News while proudly giving a tour of his one-bedroom apartment.

Larry Darden looks on while in his home at the Lowell Apartments in Salt Lake City on Wednesday, June 14, 2017. Darden, who has been in his current apartment for a year and a half, had issues previously with finding affordable housing and suffered from unsafe living conditions. | Alex Goodlett, Deseret News

But even the Lowell Apartments took nearly a year to get Darden in — largely because of the overwhelming demand in Salt Lake City for affordable housing for low-income residents. Darden knows how fortunate he is.

“Here, it’s quiet, it’s respectful. There’s no problems, it’s a great place to lay your head in,” Darden said. “It’s very, very hard to find a place like this.”

The standard rent at the Lowell Apartments is a below-market rate of $575 per month — a few hundred dollars less than he was paying — and there is flexibility on top of that. Darden works as a residential assistant there to earn the remaining amount he cannot pay.

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Many other Utahns who could use affordable housing are not as lucky. Officials estimate the state has a shortage of 43,000 affordable units. For those who simply can’t get in, the mainstream housing market has their way with them.

And that market has not been kind to low-income Utahns.

According to new data published by the National Low Income Housing Coalition, a person or household earning minimum wage must work 76 hours per week in order to reasonably afford a one-bedroom apartment at the fair market rate in Utah.

By the same metric, affording a two-bedroom apartment in Utah would require working 94 hours per week at minimum wage, the organization reported.

At just 40 hours per week, the lowest wage that could afford a two-bedroom apartment in Utah is $17.02 per hour on average, states the report, published June 8 and titled “Out of Reach: The High Cost of Housing.”

That places Utah near the middle of the road in the United States, with the 25th lowest such required wage, the National Low Income Housing Coalition said. Minimum wage in Utah is $7.25.

The findings indicate that minimum-wage workers must choose between working exorbitant hours or spending a very high and exceptionally risky portion of their income on housing, the report authors believe.

“A severely (rent) cost-burdened household is often one unexpected bill away from losing their home,” housing coalition spokeswoman Lisa Marlow said in an email, citing a medical bill or a car repair as examples. “One emergency puts them behind in paying for their housing. Families in this situation are likely to experience greater stress (and) poorer health.”

There are 276,708 renter households in Utah, accounting for about 31 percent of all residences in the state. According to the report, at 40 hours of work each week, the household earning the average wage of a Utah renter — $13.26 per hour — could reasonably afford $689 per month in rent. The average fair market rate for a two-bedroom apartment in Utah is $885 per month; it’s $716 per month for a one-bedroom apartment.

The housing coalition based its findings on the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s calculation of fair market rent rates in every American county and metropolitan area. The fair market rate is considered “what a family moving today could expect to pay for a modest apartment or rental home in the area,” Marlow said.

Following the same methodology of the federal government, the organization defines housing as affordable when household members use less than 30 percent of their income to pay for it. Households above that threshold are considered significantly cost-burdened by housing, while those who pay for it with more than 50 percent of their income are considered severely cost-burdened.

A factor in homelessness

Unaffordable housing strongly increases the chances of a minimum-wage worker being evicted and potentially becoming homeless, according to Marlow.

“Homelessness is the direct result of the affordable rental housing shortage,” she said. “We have learned from a growing collection of studies that stable, affordable housing has positive outcomes regarding health, education and employment.”

Glenn Bailey, executive director of the Crossroads Urban Center, which runs a food pantry and thrift store serving needy populations, said a clear line can be drawn between a lack of affordable housing and homelessness.+

[Source”GSmerena”]

Adam West’s campy Batman was a joy. Modern superheroes – why so serious?

 

Adam West and Burt Ward.
Adam West and Burt Ward. Photograph: Silver Screen Collection/Getty Images

We all know that the character of Batman is the 21st-century version of Hamlet. It’s a given. Every great Hollywood actor must at some point attempt to put their own spin on the enigmatic crime-fighter. If Laurence Olivier were alive today he would have dressed in the cowl, given a hammy monologue about the duality of man, all while beating up Killer Croc (played by John Gielgud).

With each rendition, Batman’s humanity gains another dimension: Christian Baledemonstrates Man’s tortured soul, Michael Keaton reflects Man’s extravagant showiness, and George Clooney represents Man’s desire to get a lucrative sideline selling Nespresso.

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The intro sequence for 1960s Batman.

In this cavalcade of Batmaniacal acting talent, one is always dismissed out of hand. Adam West, the original screen Batman, who died last week, is remembered not as the grandfather of all Batmen, but rather as a doddery, camp uncle. With his over-the-top punches and ridiculous plotlines – a surprising number of which involve surfing competitions against the Joker, West is seen by some as the man who undermined Batman’s credibility, who defiled this great character for years before it was finally claimed from the clutches of kitsch by Tim Burton and Christopher Nolan. To those people, I say “FLRBBBBB!” (the sound of West punching someone). I put it to you that not only is West’s Batman the most fun, it is also the most subversive and truthful Batman we can hope to ever witness.

People looking back at the old Batman show, which ran from 1966 to 1968, say that it has aged horribly. “It’s so camp and ridiculous! Batman is supposed to be SERIOUS,” they rage, before going to Comic-Con and getting into arguments over whether Joseph Gordon Levitt was Robin or Nightwing while dressed up in a full-length DKR costume. In reality though, a comparison between the two will never work because one is an action film and the other is an out-and-out comedy. From watching old episodes of 1960s Batman, it’s clear the show is genuinely hilarious: take a scene where Batman is holding a massive novelty explosive – he looks around twice before sighing: “Some days you just can’t get rid of a bomb.” Or the time he presses pause on catching up bad guys to correct Robin’s grammar.

The whole thing makes the current incarnation of Batman baffling – how did we go from this likeable punning idiot to Ben Affleck killing 21 people, all while wearing a face like a slapped Batbutt? It’s the equivalent of doing a dark and edgy reboot of Fawlty Towers, where Basil is played by Michael Fassbender and his years of poor customer service have led to him becoming a brooding drug addict, whose only joy in life comes from beating up his small Spanish sidekick (played broodingly by Javier Bardem).

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Trailer for Tim Burton’s 1989 Batman.

The problem is that Batman is an inherently dumb character. He’s a billionaire socialite who goes around dressed up as his least favourite animal, and beats up poor people in his spare time with a bunch of homemade gadgets. Put that in the real world – it would be as if Paris Hilton started dressing up like a sloth and attacking people with a toaster superglued to a blender. Now I’m not saying I don’t want to see a film about that – in fact, oh god, how can we turn that into a film? – but it just might be best to play it as a comedy.

In fairness to a lot of superhero movies, their fundamental silliness is being played for laughs more often these days – Marvel movies in particular, with 25 releases per year, now have an obligatory number of jokes in each film. Iron Man will joke around about shawarma for a good 15 minutes before discovering the evil villain’s plot, while even Thor, the Philip Hammond of superheroes (ostensibly powerful, really dull, but has a huge six pack), looks like he gets to make a few jokes in the new trailer. But there’s still the issue of all of these films having to interconnect and “matter” – comedy director Edgar Wright was down to do Ant-Man before he quit, supposedly because the studio’s demands that he fit in with the cinematic universe didn’t allow him enough free rein.

[Source”GSmerena”]

AA batteries power this simple smart doorbell

Image result for AA,batteries,power,this,simple,smart,doorbell

If you’re intimidated by the prospect of installing a doorbell, you aren’t alone. Fortunately, startup Olive & Dove wants to help. Its $199 smart doorbell, RemoBell, relies exclusively on AA batteries. That means you can’t even hard-wire this thing if you wanted to — with RemoBell, it’s AAs or bust.

Check out its specs:

  • Requires 6 AA batteries
  • Wi-Fi-enabled
  • 720p HD video resolution
  • Infrared night vision
  • Heat-sensing motion detector
  • Push alerts
  • Two-way audio
  • 120-degree field of view

RemoBell isn’t the first door buzzer to work over battery power, but it is the first HD video-streaming smart model I know of that opted for AAs over a rechargeable battery.

Olive & Dove says RemoBell should run for up to 4 months before needing a new set of batteries. While the reliance on batteries could be annoying if you don’t always have a stash of them on hand, it’s definitely faster than waiting for a rechargeable battery to charge fully. It also helps that AAs are easy to find, compared to Netgear’s indoor-outdoor Arlo camera, which relies on expensive and hard-to-find CR123 batteries.

I do question the 4-month battery life, particularly if the camera is located in a busy area, but RemoBell’s “heat-sensing” motion sensor is supposed to help limit alerts to people only. I’ve reached out to Olive & Dove for a review unit and hope to test out this functionality soon. The startup doesn’t mention any specific smart home integrations with RemoBell, but I wouldn’t be surprised if they’re added soon — a blog post on their site discusses the importance of the smart home and home security.

Olive & Dove hasn’t yet announced international availability, but the price converts to roughly £160 and AU$265 at the current exchange rate.

 

 

[Source:- CNET]

The beauty and ecological benefits of a garden in decay

gardening-1.jpg

Spring is not a moment in the garden but a sequence, a gentle unfurling of plant life that grows fuller by the day at a tempo that is almost out of sync with human perception.

One minute perennials are peeping out of the earth, and the next the soil is covered by fully grown greenery. The fall is the same way, except the movement is in reverse. With each passing week between early October and Thanksgiving, more perennials, grasses, groundcovers and the stuff of the lower layers of the garden will shrink, darken and start to lie down. Because our gaze is fixed on the changing leaf colors of the trees and shrubs, this other show occurs at a more subconscious level, but the two are related and deserve to be enjoyed together.

Where once the odd coneflower looked dried in the flower beds, other plants follow the same course, until there is a wholesale shift in the character of the garden from repletion to decline and seediness.

We are wired to see decay as rot, and rot as a threat to our well-being. So when we take stock of the autumn landscape, especially after a killing frost, our instinct is to clean it all up. This is a mistake on a number of levels.

The withering of the top growth of perennials and grasses is not a pernicious thing, but a natural part of their life cycle. They will re-sprout afresh in the spring from their crown buds. This year’s declining growth, meanwhile, is likely to be full of the very stuff of life, ripening seed.

I think – I hope – that our gardens are becoming more lavishly and dynamically planted with perennials and grasses, and with an ecological bent. If so, this fall conundrum will only become more pressing.

I see this decay as something beautiful, the way a steel panel becomes patinated with surface rust. So my approach to garden grooming in the fall is to remove obvious blight – shriveled hosta leaves, for example, along with diseased foliage – but to let anything else stand through the fall and winter as long as it isn’t an eyesore.

I particularly like the effect of the black stalks and seed heads of rudbeckias, from the knee-high black-eyed Susans to the taller giant coneflower. Composites as a rule make for handsome zombies, especially the purple coneflowers. The tall, wiry cup plant is lovely in its deterioration. Asters, too, are attractive in the dead months, especially when the fluffy, downy seeds make a break for it. Other effective perennials include amsonias, calamintha, perovskia and swamp milkweed. Need it be said, this is the time of year when all the ornamental grasses come into their own, green or brown, including the native bluestems, panicums and prairie drop seed.

If you want icing on this cake, nature provides it in the dewdrops of October and the ice crystals of November and December. The latter is a phenomenon called riming, and although the mid-Atlantic isn’t perhaps the best climatic region for this, when it happens you should take a moment to savor it. The most dramatic display of riming I saw was about four years ago in England, where a whole woodland beyond a field was frosted. It was like observing a finely crafted black-and-white art photo, but in negative. Such morning scenes, in miniature, await the untidy gardener.

There is an equally compelling argument for not weed-whacking and clearing the ornamental beds at this time of year, or the leaf litter that is obsessively blown, gathered and bagged in November. This detritus provides vital shelter and nourishment for wildlife. Doug Tallamy, author of a landmark book about ecological gardening, “Bringing Nature Home,” sees a direct link between the decline of fireflies and the modern-day fixation with leaf blowing. “Fireflies spend their entire larval life in the litter,” he said. “They are only adults for a short period.” Tallamy, a professor of entomology at the University of Delaware, is also co-author of “The Living Landscape.”

When we cut back the seed heads and stalks, we deprive birds and small mammals of seeds. “I always encourage people, if they have seed-producing plants such as black-eyed Susans, purple coneflowers or goldenrods, to leave them up because the overwintering birds really rely on them,” said Deborah Landau, an ecologist with the Maryland/D.C. chapter of the Nature Conservancy.

Neatniks also harm countless species of beneficial insects. Landau said other casualties include the egg masses of such creatures as praying mantises and spiders. The former resembles a hardened foam mass enveloping a stem; the latter looks like a string of pearls.

Many native bee species spend the winter as pupae within the pithy stems of perennials and the canes of hydrangeas, Tallamy said. “Much of the insect community is spending winter in that debris we get rid of all the time,” he said. One option for appearance’s sake is to cut back material in the front yard but leave dead top growth standing in less-visible parts of the garden, he said. Stalks and leaves that must be cut can be stored elsewhere outside, but don’t lay them down. The snow will flatten a pile and it will rot, he said.

Landau said these undisturbed beds also provide shelter for frogs and salamanders (and presumably a third amphibian, the toad).

Also, this debris is home to butterflies. I was in the Smithsonian’s Ripley Garden the other day, and it was Grand Central for monarch butterflies – adults, caterpillars and even pupae. If it stays warm, the chrysalises will hatch soon and the butterflies will head south. But other butterflies spend the winter here in their cocoons, and the pipevine plants were loaded with pipevine swallowtail caterpillars eating their way into a pupal stage, to emerge as adults next year.

“The less disturbance the better,” Landau said. “All these animals have adapted to depend on these plants in the winter.” Maybe we can be smart enough to copy them.

 

 

[Source:- homesandproperty]

Designing Kitchens, Bathrooms and Bedrooms – Summer Holidays 2016

Design 1 - 110 Range

We like to think we finally had some breathing space last week, as Leicestershire got their head start on the summer holidays and most people like to take advantage of the pre-school-holiday prices. But in reality, we have lots of customers coming in this week and next to see the designs we have been working on in their absence, and we want to make sure that every design ticks as many boxes as possible. We have a few major designs going on at the moment, and we’ll give you an insight into the process behind three of them.

Mrs P

We designed and fitted Mrs P’s elaborate yet understated new bathroom for her last year, so we’ve been given another chance to impress with her huge kitchen.

Elongated but with cute alcoves and features, the open plan kitchen / diner / sitting area looking out onto a gorgeous garden is an exciting challenge for any designer. When we started meeting Mrs P about her kitchen, we discussed whether she would prefer modern or traditional, form or function, whether glazed or solid doors were preferable, and many, many other topics of conversation relating to Mrs P’s kitchen preferences. Fortunately for our creative side, Mrs P is open to all ideas, but particularly loved our Austin (real ash, painted shaker) door in our showroom.

So, to begin with, we used ArtiCAD to create three different designs which all utilised the adorable little alcove which you will see on the rendered image below. The first placed a lovely 110 Range cooker in the space with cupboards and spice racks either side for immediate access to anything Mrs P may need when cooking.

The second incorporated a bank of tall larder units framing Mrs P’s American Fridge Freezer, with a lift up top box above the fridge itself for maximum utilisation of space.

The third is completely different, turning the alcove into a cosy window seating area with incorporated under-seat bookshelves, allowing us to move the Range cooker to another wall where we can put a mantle over it, which is always a fabulous statement in any kitchen. So far, Mrs P has eliminated option 2, which means we can focus on other elements of the kitchen. It may sound strange, but we like to show our customers designs even if we do not think they will like the design in particular. It means that when you have finally chosen your design and had your new kitchen fitted, you’ll never have any doubts or wishes that we had designed it for you in a different way.

Before Mrs P left our showroom a couple of weeks ago, we discussed the idea of a beach-themed kitchen, making full use of our brand new Windsor Blue doors, complemented with Ivory or White Cotton wall units. We all got quite excited about designing this, and let us tell you, it looks fantastic. However, we can not show you the designs until Mrs P has seen them first – sorry! Keep checking our News page for updates and we might let you have a sneak peek!

 

[Source:- greenstone-kbb]

 

Wave – Wooden Flooring Collection

wave-collection-wooden-flooring-2

Inspired by non-rectified planks of Nordic Countries. Wave is a creative pre-finished European Oak flooring inspired by non-rectified planks typical in Nordic Countries that in the past used to be laid respecting the irregular and natural trunk shape.

The look of the wavy planks, the three elegant colors (black, grey, white) and the alternating of supernatural Matt and high Glossy finishes, make the wood flooring so new and modern. It’s a high sophisticated parquet, where the combination of colors and refinements emphasizes the wavy lines on the floor, almost like an optical effect.

 

 

[Source:- Interirozine]

Solve this puzzle and (maybe) win a job at Dyson

Image result for Solve this puzzle and (maybe) win a job at Dyson

Are you smart enough to escape a locked room — and walk into a job at Dyson?

The British company, famous for its vacuum cleaners and other slinkily designed home appliances, is recruiting 110 software engineers. And in a stunt to promote that hunt for new talent, Dyson is combining cryptic video brainteasers with one of those “escape the room“-type challenges.

On Saturday 4 February and Sunday 5 February, Dyson will open The Smart Rooms, a pop-up puzzle palace in London where contenders must complete software-engineering-based challenges. It’s like “The Crystal Maze”, only nerdier.

Working as part of a team on on your own, you’ll quest to solve each puzzle and advance to the next room. Each challenge is projected onto the walls, so although you’re not actually moving, you advance through different virtual environments.

The winners take home a 360 Eye robot vacuum cleaner signed by James Dyson himself. And who knows, maybe Jim will spot your talent and take you on.

If you think you’re smart enough to crack the Smart Rooms, all you have to do is find the entry code hidden in this video and send it to Dyson. Oh, and travel to London, but you’re smart — you can figure that out on your own.

 

 

 
[Source:- CNET]