Foundry seeks to replace carpet, flooring

Replacing the carpet

REYNOLDSVILLE — The carpet and flooring in The Foundry in Reynoldsville is experiencing some wear and tear.

Judy Dickerson, center director of The Foundry, is seeking to do something about it.

According to Dickerson, the carpet is worn and soiled, and the laminate floor is chipping and coming up in places.

She noted that an effort is underway to raise money for new carpeting and a new floor.

The fundraising includes a lasagna benefit dinner that will be held from 5 to 7 p.m. on Friday, June 23.

The cost is $7 for adults and $5 for children six years old and under. There will be a carry-out, which is a dollar more.

According to Dickerson, a well-known Italian cook, Judi Anderson of Brookville, will make the meal.

[Source”pcworld”]

The beauty and ecological benefits of a garden in decay

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Spring is not a moment in the garden but a sequence, a gentle unfurling of plant life that grows fuller by the day at a tempo that is almost out of sync with human perception.

One minute perennials are peeping out of the earth, and the next the soil is covered by fully grown greenery. The fall is the same way, except the movement is in reverse. With each passing week between early October and Thanksgiving, more perennials, grasses, groundcovers and the stuff of the lower layers of the garden will shrink, darken and start to lie down. Because our gaze is fixed on the changing leaf colors of the trees and shrubs, this other show occurs at a more subconscious level, but the two are related and deserve to be enjoyed together.

Where once the odd coneflower looked dried in the flower beds, other plants follow the same course, until there is a wholesale shift in the character of the garden from repletion to decline and seediness.

We are wired to see decay as rot, and rot as a threat to our well-being. So when we take stock of the autumn landscape, especially after a killing frost, our instinct is to clean it all up. This is a mistake on a number of levels.

The withering of the top growth of perennials and grasses is not a pernicious thing, but a natural part of their life cycle. They will re-sprout afresh in the spring from their crown buds. This year’s declining growth, meanwhile, is likely to be full of the very stuff of life, ripening seed.

I think – I hope – that our gardens are becoming more lavishly and dynamically planted with perennials and grasses, and with an ecological bent. If so, this fall conundrum will only become more pressing.

I see this decay as something beautiful, the way a steel panel becomes patinated with surface rust. So my approach to garden grooming in the fall is to remove obvious blight – shriveled hosta leaves, for example, along with diseased foliage – but to let anything else stand through the fall and winter as long as it isn’t an eyesore.

I particularly like the effect of the black stalks and seed heads of rudbeckias, from the knee-high black-eyed Susans to the taller giant coneflower. Composites as a rule make for handsome zombies, especially the purple coneflowers. The tall, wiry cup plant is lovely in its deterioration. Asters, too, are attractive in the dead months, especially when the fluffy, downy seeds make a break for it. Other effective perennials include amsonias, calamintha, perovskia and swamp milkweed. Need it be said, this is the time of year when all the ornamental grasses come into their own, green or brown, including the native bluestems, panicums and prairie drop seed.

If you want icing on this cake, nature provides it in the dewdrops of October and the ice crystals of November and December. The latter is a phenomenon called riming, and although the mid-Atlantic isn’t perhaps the best climatic region for this, when it happens you should take a moment to savor it. The most dramatic display of riming I saw was about four years ago in England, where a whole woodland beyond a field was frosted. It was like observing a finely crafted black-and-white art photo, but in negative. Such morning scenes, in miniature, await the untidy gardener.

There is an equally compelling argument for not weed-whacking and clearing the ornamental beds at this time of year, or the leaf litter that is obsessively blown, gathered and bagged in November. This detritus provides vital shelter and nourishment for wildlife. Doug Tallamy, author of a landmark book about ecological gardening, “Bringing Nature Home,” sees a direct link between the decline of fireflies and the modern-day fixation with leaf blowing. “Fireflies spend their entire larval life in the litter,” he said. “They are only adults for a short period.” Tallamy, a professor of entomology at the University of Delaware, is also co-author of “The Living Landscape.”

When we cut back the seed heads and stalks, we deprive birds and small mammals of seeds. “I always encourage people, if they have seed-producing plants such as black-eyed Susans, purple coneflowers or goldenrods, to leave them up because the overwintering birds really rely on them,” said Deborah Landau, an ecologist with the Maryland/D.C. chapter of the Nature Conservancy.

Neatniks also harm countless species of beneficial insects. Landau said other casualties include the egg masses of such creatures as praying mantises and spiders. The former resembles a hardened foam mass enveloping a stem; the latter looks like a string of pearls.

Many native bee species spend the winter as pupae within the pithy stems of perennials and the canes of hydrangeas, Tallamy said. “Much of the insect community is spending winter in that debris we get rid of all the time,” he said. One option for appearance’s sake is to cut back material in the front yard but leave dead top growth standing in less-visible parts of the garden, he said. Stalks and leaves that must be cut can be stored elsewhere outside, but don’t lay them down. The snow will flatten a pile and it will rot, he said.

Landau said these undisturbed beds also provide shelter for frogs and salamanders (and presumably a third amphibian, the toad).

Also, this debris is home to butterflies. I was in the Smithsonian’s Ripley Garden the other day, and it was Grand Central for monarch butterflies – adults, caterpillars and even pupae. If it stays warm, the chrysalises will hatch soon and the butterflies will head south. But other butterflies spend the winter here in their cocoons, and the pipevine plants were loaded with pipevine swallowtail caterpillars eating their way into a pupal stage, to emerge as adults next year.

“The less disturbance the better,” Landau said. “All these animals have adapted to depend on these plants in the winter.” Maybe we can be smart enough to copy them.

 

 

[Source:- homesandproperty]

Wave – Wooden Flooring Collection

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Inspired by non-rectified planks of Nordic Countries. Wave is a creative pre-finished European Oak flooring inspired by non-rectified planks typical in Nordic Countries that in the past used to be laid respecting the irregular and natural trunk shape.

The look of the wavy planks, the three elegant colors (black, grey, white) and the alternating of supernatural Matt and high Glossy finishes, make the wood flooring so new and modern. It’s a high sophisticated parquet, where the combination of colors and refinements emphasizes the wavy lines on the floor, almost like an optical effect.

 

 

[Source:- Interirozine]

RHS Wisley hosts Butterflies in the Glasshouse

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Step out of winter and into a tropical paradise this winter.

RHS Wisley’s Glasshouse is the temporary home, until March 5th, for more than 6,000 free-flying exotic butterflies that are content to flit around the rainforest atmosphere of the Tropical Zone.

You will see more than 50 different butterfly species from the tropical world and be able to take photographs as many of them settle on the huge foliage and vibrant flowers as well as the occasional visitor.

In the interactive Education Zone you can learn about the fascinating lifecycle of a butterfly, get close to caterpillars and use microscopes to examine wings of the world’s most exquisite butterflies.

And naturally you enjoy butterfly-decorated cookies and cupcakes from the Taste of Wisley bakers at the Glasshouse Cafe.

Butterflies in the Glasshouse is free with normal garden entry and admission is always available, but you can pre-book a time slot by visiting gardentickets.rhs.org.uk.

 

 

 

[Source:- homesandproperty]

Unusual Wall Paneling of Wooden Parquet at Igniv Restaurant

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After the success of Milan Design Week – Biscuit designed by Patricia Urquiola for Listone Giordano, conquers Europe with a beautiful project in Switzerland – Igniv Restaurant at Bad Ragaz Grand Resort.

The Spanish designer Patricia Urquiola has taken her cues from the restaurant’s name – which means nest in Rhaeto-Romanic, one of Switzerland’s official languages – to mix brass, leather, golden hued table bases, and stone with an unusual wall paneling of wooden parquet by flooring company Listone Giordano. In a cozy setting, with a vaulted ceiling and an open fire, the designer created wood paneling using Biscuit that increases the sense of warmth and privacy, in a skillful mix of history and contemporary.

The duet of tradition and innovation creates eye-catching solutions that could stand alone as furnishing systems, much more than simple flooring. These collections exalt architectural design, adding innovation to the warmth and texture of wood. The collection centers on rediscovering the decorative power of parquet and the quintessentially feminine trait of softness expressed in rounded, curved blocks and a slight embossing of the surface. The patterns – regular lengthwise, inlay, mosaics or herringbone – do not differ enormously from the classic wooden floor options, but the size and the rounded tips of the wooden boards produce an entirely new look. Biscuit is made of French oak. The wooden strips can be assembled in six different patterns and used for flooring and high impact wall cladding.

 

[Source:- Interirozine]

 

How to create a year-round garden:take a tour of the ultimate ‘outdoor room’ designed by Abigail Ahern

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With a coffee table overhung with a chandelier, a snug two-seater and curvy armchairs ranged around a fireplace, as well as a kitchen and dining table, Abigail Ahern’s back garden has to be the ultimate outdoor room.

When she moved to Hackney with husband Graham 13 years ago, Ahern, an accomplished interior designer but a self-confessed non-gardener, approached the outside space with caution. “At first I did what everybody else did, and had stuff down the perimeter and nothing in the middle,” she says, “but as I became more confident, I realised the same principles I applied to inside could apply to the outside.

“One of these is that you never have everything on the perimeter. I like to design interiors so you can’t walk in a straight line from one end of the room to the other, because there’s always something in your way. It’s the difference between walking in a field, where you can see all around you which is really boring, or in a forest, where you’re not sure what’s around the next corner. That’s what I wanted to do here.”

This atmospheric retreat, with weathered decking, leafy tree canopies and stashes of logs for fires indoors and out, looks like it was built in the heart of a forest. That is, if it weren’t for the cowboy cacti — realistic fakes that Ahern sells in her Islington shop and has tucked in among the hydrangea bushes, adding a touch of Santa Fe to the patio — and the petrol blue cabin at the rear, a £100 eBay find upcycled by Graham.

The roomy patio with York stone paving looks as cosy as the living room on the other side of the huge, two-storey glass doors. Another Ahern design principle is to supersize features and furniture to make a space look larger, so naturally, as well as chandeliers in every room of the house, an outsize chandelier of tiered driftwood pieces hangs over the black lacquer coffee table.

Lighting is a game changer, indoors and out, says Ahern. “I have a problem finding outdoor lights I like, so I put indoor lights outside, and have them professionally rewired.” These include a standard lamp and a Sixties pendant shade, while the bonus of overhanging electric cable is that the mile-a-minute vine scrambles along it, creating playful garlands of green above the patio.

To the right of the patio-cum-sittingroom is the dining area, defined by an Indian zinc-topped table from Petersham Nurseries and a customised concrete kitchen from Dutch company WWOO.

“The company customised the kitchen to fit around the Big Green Egg, a barbecue cooker I’m obsessed with ever since I designed a set for a TV programme with Heston Blumenthal, who uses it all the time. You can bake on it, roast with it and it’s all temperature controlled. We put something in on a Saturday morning, slow cook it for 10 hours and come back in the evening and supper’s ready. We even cook the Christmas turkey on it.”

Playing with different textures is a big part of Ahern’s design philosophy, and is apparent in her choice of materials in both hardscape and planting. The decked garden path that leads down to the cabin is a clever fake from Millboard that resembles old, weather-worn oak timber, and is edged down either side with a deep ruff of variegated tufted grass Carex oshimensis Everest.

Pebbles — another textural contrast — are her choice of flooring on either side, giving Ahern the freedom to gradually plant both areas over time. On one side is a wall of rustling bamboo, which she planted so she could look down from her bedroom window and enjoy the constant movement, and on the opposite wall, a sheet of evergreen jasmine. “We planted about 20 tiny plants and now the scent of the flowers in summer is beautiful,” she says. “I’m mad about watering all the time to make them cover the wall.”

 

[Source:- homesandproperty]

 

Beautiful Lighting Structure by Mariam Ayvazyan

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The slightly curved wooden frame of this ceiling light is enclosing white flowers, made of felted wool creating a beautiful structure that represents minimalist and clean aesthetics from nature. The LED lights, enclosed in crystal and hung on thick red wires, glow vibrantly, achieving a delicate lacy pattern on the ceiling. Different shapes of the flowers create romantic and joyful atmosphere by gently filtering the light that shines through the crystal.

These fixtures will suit anyone who loves both modern or retro design. Materials: LED lights enclosed in crystal, curved wooden frame, felted wool flowers. Handmade by Mariam Ayvazyan where I assemble the fixture with my very own hands.

 

 

[Source:- Interiorzine]

 

Furniture Meets Light: Empty by VIBIA

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EMPTY was designed by Xuclà, its rational structure, and architectonic language are combined in a sophisticated manner for outdoor spaces both green and urban settings. EMPTY achieves this complete spatial integration thanks to its simple straight lines, acting as either auxiliary table or stool while encouraging moments of pause and relaxation.

Through its use of LED light sources located in a non-visible internal part of its structure EMPTY becomes a beacon that provides a pleasant lighting effect and point source for outdoors areas.

 

 

[Source:- Interiorzine]

 

3D Printed Cubic Light by Mariam Ayvazyan

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This cubical table lamp is printed on a 3D printer and presents a complex geometrical structure of crystal lattice. Arrays of regularly spaced interconnected white spheres are increasing in size diagonally. Inside the Cube, there is a cluster of LED lights. This structure diffuses the light creating soft and intimate atmosphere. Could be customized in any size and color.

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[Source:- Interiorzine]

How to care for houseplants in winter Follow these expert tips

African Violets Blooming In Potted Plant On Window Sill

During winter months the growth of most houseplants slows down and, apart from plants that keep growing, it is best to reduce watering until the spring.

Let the compost dry out before adding tepid water and drain away the excess so the pot doesn’t stand in water. There is no need to feed a plant that is resting.

Houseplants like an even temperature and not an overheated room that drops dramatically overnight. For this reason, avoid putting plants on a window sill that will become very cold at night. If possible, move plants away from radiators and draughts as both will cause damage.

Knowing the original environment the plant came from will help you recreate the best conditions. Add more moisture to tropical ones by misting frequently or stand the pot on a saucer filled with gravel and a little water.

Keep temperatures warmer for desert plants. Cyclamen and Azaleas are not happy in high temperatures, though African violets, Steptocarpus (Cape primrose) and Poinsettias are. Tough foliage like Yucca, Palms and Aspidistra are better in cooler rooms.

Keep leaves looking their best by removing dust gently with a soft cloth or brush and then wipe with a moist cloth.

[Source:- Housebeautiful]