Microsoft 4Q17: Office 365 revenue surpasses traditional licenses

In the fourth quarter of its 2017 financial year, Microsoft posted revenue of $23.3 billion (£17.9 billion), up 13 percent on a year ago, with an operating income of $5.3 billion (up 73 percent), a net income of $6.5 billion (up 109 percent), and earnings per share of $0.83 (up 112 percent on the same quarter last year).

For the full 2017 financial year, revenue was $90.0 billion (up 5 percent on 2016), operating income was $22.3 billion (up 11 percent), net income was $21.2 billion (up 26 percent), and earnings per share were $3.31 (up 29 percent).

Microsoft currently has three reporting segments: Productivity and Business Processes (covering Office, Exchange, SharePoint, Skype, and Dynamics), Intelligent Cloud (including Azure, Windows Server, SQL Server, Visual Studio, and Enterprise Services), and More Personal Computing (covering Windows, hardware, and Xbox, as well as search and advertising).

As was the case last quarter, Microsoft is including its LinkedIn results in the Productivity group, as well as breaking them out independently. Revenue for the social network was $1.1 billion, with operating expenses of $1.0 billion and cost of revenue of $0.4 billion, for a total operating loss of $0.4 billion.

The Productivity group reported revenue of $8.5 billion, up 21 percent year on year, with operating income of $2.8 billion, down 8 percent. LinkedIn was responsible for much of the growth in revenue and the decline in operating income. Office 365 commercial revenue was up 43 percent, with seats growing 31 percent and the rest coming from increased revenue per user. Traditional commercial Office licensing was down 17 percent, as Office users migrate from perpetual and Software Assurance licensing to Office 365 subscriptions. Office 365 consumer seats have grown to 27 million. Microsoft CFO Amy Hood said that this transition had reached a key tipping point: Office 365 revenue surpassed license revenue for the first time.

Cloud group revenue was $7.4 billion, up 11 percent, with operating income up 15 percent to $2.5 billion. Server product and cloud revenue both grew 15 percent, with Azure revenue up 97 percent, and compute usage growing by more than double. Enterprise Services revenue, however, fell 3 percent, as Windows Server 2003 support contracts ended.

Microsoft’s total commercial-cloud annualized run rate is now $18.9 billion, and it should hit $20 billion in the next financial year.

More Personal Computing revenue dropped 2 percent to $8.9 billion, with operating income up 68 percent to $1.8 billion. The decline in revenue was due to the evaporation of Microsoft’s phone presence—revenue was essentially zero, just as it was last quarter—along with a 2-percent drop in Surface revenue. For most of the quarter, Microsoft was continuing to sell some old, rather stale systems; the new Surface Pro and Surface Laptop were only available for two weeks of the period.

On the other hand, Windows revenue was surprisingly strong; OEM Pro revenue was up 3 percent, ahead of corporate PC market, due to a greater shift to high-end systems and SKUs. OEM non-Pro revenue was flat, though this still outperformed the consumer PC market, again due to the shift toward premium devices. Search revenue was up 10 percent, thanks to more searches and more revenue per search.

Gaming revenue was up 3 percent, with an 11 percent increase in Xbox software and services revenue. Xbox Live monthly active users was also up, to 53 million.

Overall, then, the quarter showed some familiar strengths and weaknesses. The transition to Office 365 is, for Microsoft, an enormous success story, showing that not only can the company change its business, distribution, and development models, but that, with perseverance, it can bring customers along for the ride.

But the Surface and phone stories show that the company still has difficulties in some segments and that it still hasn’t really resolved how those segments are going to be handled. If Microsoft wants to be in hardware seriously, then the delays to updating its lines—and the substantial revenue hit that came with those delays—have to end. If, on the other hand, it’s content to merely dabble then it should probably make this clearer to the businesses that are buying Surface machines for their fleets. Right now, Microsoft still isn’t acting like a real PC hardware company, but it’s not not acting like one either. It’s time to, uh, commit, or get off the pot

[Source”pcworld”]

Expanded African Nations Cup set to become traditional summer tournament

Expanded African Nations Cup set to become traditional summer tournament

By Eurosport

14 minutes agoUpdated 5 minutes ago

The African Nations Cup finals are set to be expanded to 24 teams and moved to dates in June and July but will continue to be held every two years after recommendations on the tournament at a symposium in Morocco on Wednesday.

The decision must still be ratified by the Confederation of African Football’s executive committee, but that could come as early as Thursday when they meet in Rabat.

The recommendations were made after a workshop on the future of the tournament that included much of CAF’s leadership, and the decision is expected to be rubber-stamped.

The timing of the Nations Cup finals has been contentious as it has been played in January, in the middle of the league season in Europe. The majority of Nations Cup players come from European clubs and increasingly found themselves drawn into a club versus country tug-of-war.

Ivory Coast's captain Yaya Toure celebrates with team mates after winning the African Nations Cup final against Ghana

Ivory Coast’s captain Yaya Toure celebrates with team mates after winning the African Nations Cup final against GhanaReuters

The increase in teams follows the expansion of the European Championship last year, which African observers said had been a success.

“From a sporting perspective, it will allow more opportunity for footballers across the continent. It will increase revenue for CAF and we can triple our income. It will also force more infrastructure development,” said Nigerian Football Federation President Amaju Pinnock, who is also a CAF executive committee member.

#But the tournament will not be cut to once every four years as in Europe because its revenue remains a cornerstone of CAF’s income. It also provides much needed competitive matches in the qualifying competition for smaller African associations, whose limited finances means they rely heavily on state support. Such support across Africa is readily given for official competitions as opposed to friendly internationals.

The proposal to increase the scale of the finals to 24 teams did raise some opposition at the symposium, however.

“This will restrict to just a handful the number of African countries who are able to host future Nations Cup,” said former Cameroon goalkeeper Joseph-Antoine Bell, one of over 200 African football personalities at the symposium

[Source”cnbc”]

Without Understanding What Traditional Knowledge Is, We Cannot Utilize It Appropriately

KAMPALA — For a long time, traditional knowledge and traditional cultural expressions were timidly recognised as intellectual efforts worthy of legal protection. Of recent, indigenous peoples, local communities, and some governments have demanded the recognition of traditional forms of creativity and innovation as protectable intellectual property.

Sculpture depicting traditional homestead activities

Because traditional knowledge is considered as part of the public domain, it raises key issues as to how it can be protected so as to serve the interests of traditional communities, states, as well as the users.

To raise more awareness, the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) and Uganda Registration Services Bureau (URSB) conducted a Traditional Knowledge as Intellectual Property for Economic Development Workshop in Kampala last week. The workshop had participants from Uganda, Kenya, Malawi, Zanzibar, South Africa and Ghana.

The objective of the workshop was to “sensitise, engage and facilitate national dialogue on Intellectual Property (IP) and Traditional Knowledge (TK), Traditional Cultural Expressions (TCEs) and Genetic Resources (GR) as a first step to develop a national policy or strategy on technical knowledge to be integrated into the recently validated national IP policy,” according to the workshop agenda paper.

The country’s National IP Policy was validated in Kampala earlier in the year, and is now awaiting approval from the Uganda cabinet.

WIPO defines TK as a living body of knowledge that is developed, sustained and passed on from generation to generation within a community. It often forms part of a people’s cultural and spiritual identity.

Uganda, according to the Uganda National Culture Policy, is endowed with a rich and diverse cultural heritage, which includes 65 indigenous communities with unique characteristics. The diversity contributes to a wealth of indigenous knowledge, languages, folklore, customs and traditions and products that can be harnessed for development.

Two legislative acts directly address the legislation of TK in Uganda.

According to the Uganda Copyright and Neighbouring Rights Act, TK and folklore are part of works eligible for copyright protection.

The other legislation for TK is mentioned in the Industrial Property Act, Section 21 (8), which calls for a mandatory disclosure requirement for all innovations that seek to be protected, “including any element of traditional knowledge associated or not with those resources.”

Agaba Gilbert, the IP manager at URSB, in his presentation titled“Intellectual Property and Traditional Knowledge and Traditional Cultural Expressions,” added that TCE works protected by copyright include verbal expressions, musical expressions and expressions by action.

Others are tangible expressions such as productions of art, in particular, drawings, designs, paintings, carvings, sculptures, pottery, terracotta, mosaic, woodwork, metalware, jewellery, baskets, needlework, textiles, glassware, carpets, costumes; handicrafts; musical instruments; and architectural forms.

The Ugandan law is vague however, according to Anthony Kakooza: “It does not provide for ownership of traditional cultural expressions (TCEs) nor does it state how such works can be identified or how such protection can be implemented”. Kakooza is the dean, Faculty of Law, Uganda Christian University, and a researcher in IP.

“It is also erroneous in ranking TCEs as ‘eligible for copyright’ and yet they lack a clearly identifiable origin; have no defined ownership; and no ascertained duration unlike recognised works of copyright,” Kakooza added.

Case Study

In the run-up to the 2011 presidential elections in Uganda, presidential candidate Yoweri Museveni released a hip-hop rap song, intended to appeal to youthful voters. The Museveni team went ahead and applied to register the song, ‘You Want Another Rap,’ for copyright protection.

Two members of the public contested the application, stating that: the work is in the public domain free for all to use; the applicant has not made any improvement on the poems; the applicant merely recited the poem as an act of performance; and that the work constitutes public property and the application is an abuse of intellectual property.

Museveni’s counsel countered that the president is only applying to protect his derivative expression “rather than restrict the use of earlier and differently expressed versions.”

This matter is the first legal contestation over property rights in folklore in Uganda, Kakooza said in his thesis titled, “The Cultural Divide: Traditional Cultural Expressions and the Entertainment Industry in Developing Economies.”

One of the challenges faced by developing countries in exploiting their TK and TCEs is inadequate data on these. Such governments, including Uganda, do not have the statistics. Documenting TK and TCEs has emerged as one of the tools which may play a role in impeding further loss of TK, maintaining TK over time, supporting benefit-sharing and, ultimately, protecting TK and TCEs from unwanted uses.

There’s also the challenge of administering TK and TCEs over cross-border communities. Like Uganda, most communities were split up during boundary demarcations by the colonial governments.

Unlike IP, there’s no individual ownership and ascertainable durability in TK and TCEs.

According to Naana Halm, an IP expert and legal researcher, communities need to pinpoint certain aspects of IP protection to protect TK and TCEs on larger scales in order to reach international markets. Halm was presenting a paper titled: “The role of IP in promoting and commercialising products based on TK and TCEs.”

According to Wend Wendland, director, WIPO TK Division, there’s a need to reconcile competing policy objectives. This can be achieved by respecting dignity of indigenous communities, promoting cultural exchange, fostering creativity and the cultural industries, reserving cultural heritage, and propelling socio-economic development of communities.

To address the needs of the different parties, Kakooza advocates for: preservation of culture using an archival base, educational institutions, museums and cultural centres; negotiated use of TCEs over issues such as economic and moral rights, as well as respecting sacred rites; developing a partnership for TCE usage with key partners being the state and traditional communities, and encouraging creative content.

The Nagoya Protocol on Access to Genetic Resources and the Fair and Equitable Sharing of Benefits Arising from their Utilization to the Convention on Biological Diversity (2010), as well as ongoing negotiations within the WIPO Intergovernmental Committee on Genetic Resources and Intellectual Property, Genetic Resources and Folklore (IGC) to design an international instrument(s) for the protection of TK and TCEs, are recent reflections of an explicit commitment by the international community to protect the intellectual rights of indigenous peoples and local communities.

[Source”timesofindia”]

 

Without Understanding What Traditional Knowledge Is, We Cannot Utilize It Appropriately

KAMPALA — For a long time, traditional knowledge and traditional cultural expressions were timidly recognised as intellectual efforts worthy of legal protection. Of recent, indigenous peoples, local communities, and some governments have demanded the recognition of traditional forms of creativity and innovation as protectable intellectual property.

Because traditional knowledge is considered as part of the public domain, it raises key issues as to how it can be protected so as to serve the interests of traditional communities, states, as well as the users.

To raise more awareness, the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) and Uganda Registration Services Bureau (URSB) conducted a Traditional Knowledge as Intellectual Property for Economic Development Workshop in Kampala last week. The workshop had participants from Uganda, Kenya, Malawi, Zanzibar, South Africa and Ghana.

The objective of the workshop was to “sensitise, engage and facilitate national dialogue on Intellectual Property (IP) and Traditional Knowledge (TK), Traditional Cultural Expressions (TCEs) and Genetic Resources (GR) as a first step to develop a national policy or strategy on technical knowledge to be integrated into the recently validated national IP policy,” according to the workshop agenda paper.

The country’s National IP Policy was validated in Kampala earlier in the year, and is now awaiting approval from the Uganda cabinet.

WIPO defines TK as a living body of knowledge that is developed, sustained and passed on from generation to generation within a community. It often forms part of a people’s cultural and spiritual identity.

Uganda, according to the Uganda National Culture Policy, is endowed with a rich and diverse cultural heritage, which includes 65 indigenous communities with unique characteristics. The diversity contributes to a wealth of indigenous knowledge, languages, folklore, customs and traditions and products that can be harnessed for development.

Two legislative acts directly address the legislation of TK in Uganda.

According to the Uganda Copyright and Neighbouring Rights Act, TK and folklore are part of works eligible for copyright protection.

The other legislation for TK is mentioned in the Industrial Property Act, Section 21 (8), which calls for a mandatory disclosure requirement for all innovations that seek to be protected, “including any element of traditional knowledge associated or not with those resources.”

Agaba Gilbert, the IP manager at URSB, in his presentation titled“Intellectual Property and Traditional Knowledge and Traditional Cultural Expressions,” added that TCE works protected by copyright include verbal expressions, musical expressions and expressions by action.

Others are tangible expressions such as productions of art, in particular, drawings, designs, paintings, carvings, sculptures, pottery, terracotta, mosaic, woodwork, metalware, jewellery, baskets, needlework, textiles, glassware, carpets, costumes; handicrafts; musical instruments; and architectural forms.

The Ugandan law is vague however, according to Anthony Kakooza: “It does not provide for ownership of traditional cultural expressions (TCEs) nor does it state how such works can be identified or how such protection can be implemented”. Kakooza is the dean, Faculty of Law, Uganda Christian University, and a researcher in IP.

“It is also erroneous in ranking TCEs as ‘eligible for copyright’ and yet they lack a clearly identifiable origin; have no defined ownership; and no ascertained duration unlike recognised works of copyright,” Kakooza added.

Case Study

In the run-up to the 2011 presidential elections in Uganda, presidential candidate Yoweri Museveni released a hip-hop rap song, intended to appeal to youthful voters. The Museveni team went ahead and applied to register the song, ‘You Want Another Rap,’ for copyright protection.

Two members of the public contested the application, stating that: the work is in the public domain free for all to use; the applicant has not made any improvement on the poems; the applicant merely recited the poem as an act of performance; and that the work constitutes public property and the application is an abuse of intellectual property.

Museveni’s counsel countered that the president is only applying to protect his derivative expression “rather than restrict the use of earlier and differently expressed versions.”

This matter is the first legal contestation over property rights in folklore in Uganda, Kakooza said in his thesis titled, “The Cultural Divide: Traditional Cultural Expressions and the Entertainment Industry in Developing Economies.”

One of the challenges faced by developing countries in exploiting their TK and TCEs is inadequate data on these. Such governments, including Uganda, do not have the statistics. Documenting TK and TCEs has emerged as one of the tools which may play a role in impeding further loss of TK, maintaining TK over time, supporting benefit-sharing and, ultimately, protecting TK and TCEs from unwanted uses.

There’s also the challenge of administering TK and TCEs over cross-border communities. Like Uganda, most communities were split up during boundary demarcations by the colonial governments.

Unlike IP, there’s no individual ownership and ascertainable durability in TK and TCEs.

According to Naana Halm, an IP expert and legal researcher, communities need to pinpoint certain aspects of IP protection to protect TK and TCEs on larger scales in order to reach international markets. Halm was presenting a paper titled: “The role of IP in promoting and commercialising products based on TK and TCEs.”

According to Wend Wendland, director, WIPO TK Division, there’s a need to reconcile competing policy objectives. This can be achieved by respecting dignity of indigenous communities, promoting cultural exchange, fostering creativity and the cultural industries, reserving cultural heritage, and propelling socio-economic development of communities.

To address the needs of the different parties, Kakooza advocates for: preservation of culture using an archival base, educational institutions, museums and cultural centres; negotiated use of TCEs over issues such as economic and moral rights, as well as respecting sacred rites; developing a partnership for TCE usage with key partners being the state and traditional communities, and encouraging creative content.

The Nagoya Protocol on Access to Genetic Resources and the Fair and Equitable Sharing of Benefits Arising from their Utilization to the Convention on Biological Diversity (2010), as well as ongoing negotiations within the WIPO Intergovernmental Committee on Genetic Resources and Intellectual Property, Genetic Resources and Folklore (IGC) to design an international instrument(s) for the protection of TK and TCEs, are recent reflections of an explicit commitment by the international community to protect the intellectual rights of indigenous peoples and local communities.

LaVar Ball: Lonzo’s shoe choices ‘making a statement’ to traditional companies

Image result for LaVar Ball: Lonzo's shoe choices 'making a statement' to traditional companies

Lonzo Ball has been trying to send a message to shoe companies throughout the Las Vegas Summer League. In his last three games, he has played in a different brand of shoe, and the results have been solid. He scored 36 points in Nikes, dropped a triple-double in Adidas, and had a do-everything type game in Under Armour.

Lonzo’s father, LaVar, confirmed to ESPN that the last three games have been a message to companies on what they can have while still affirming their Big Baller Brand is worth $1 billion.

“It’s making a statement to the brands of what they could have had with an open mind,” Ball said via text message. “The players are the brand ambassadors. The brand is nothing without the players.”

Asked whether there is still a chance for a big shoe brand to sign his son, LaVar responded: “If the price is right. Quite frankly we are officially in the shoe game, and are a billion-dollar brand either way.”

The Balls made noise when they revealed Lonzo’s plans on playing in his own Big Baller Brand shoes. LaVar wants to sublicense products from their brand to one of the shoe giants.

The plan to make $1 billion dollars from a sublicense seems unlikely, but ESPN’s Darren Rovell reports that Ball could receive a higher shoe deal than what he was initially offered.

Industry sources said the traditional companies have offered Lonzo Ball deals in the range of $1.5 million per year. Playing on the Lakers, plus the power of his holdout, could boost that to over $2 million per year.

Summer league at this point can sometimes drag on a little, but the nightly questions of what brand Lonzo Ball will be wearing for each game have at least provided a fun storyline. It probably isn’t going to get him much more money than he was going to receive as the second overall pick on the Lakers, but it was worth a shot. Maybe in the semifinals he’ll come out with New Balance and then win the tournament in Starburys.

 [Source”indianexpress”]

Bhopal: Many still prefer traditional reading practice

Bhopal: The Bhopal Municipal Corporation (BMC) amidst much fanfare started e-library facility at Dr Ambedkar Library on Monday.

Inaugurating the e-library facility, Mayor Alok Sharma urged the students of the city to avail the service to the fullest to perform well in the examinations and make the city proud. However, while speaking to readers, they had a mixed reaction about the new facility with many advocating the traditional reading practice with a book in hand.

The newly launched e-library comprises eight computer systems and about 6,500 e-books on various subjects ranging from engineering, medical studies, art & culture, banking, NCERT, civil services examinations and others. The maximum books in the e-library are of competitive examinations. The library has a total membership of about 100 members with similar number of footfalls on six days a week.

One of the regular visitor, 23-year-old Ajit Singh from Gandhi Nagar locality says that the e-library facility would help them preparing competitive examinations.

“I am preparing for Madhya Pradesh Public Service Commission (MPPSC) examination. As the examination and other competitive examinations are now online, I think this new facility would help the aspirants in that manner,” said Singh, who is coming to the library for the last two years, told Free Press Journal (FPJ).

Advocating the facility, he also cited the advantage of saving time by using e-library.

“In the traditional library one has to spend significant time while searching a particular book but in e-library one has to search in the database and the required book would come up within seconds,” added Singh.

However not many were in favour of shifting to e-library in the library as they think it is of no match to the traditional reading habits.

“The e-library would never be able to give the feel of a traditional reading habit in a library by holding a book in hand and smelling the smell of pages inside it. Apart from this to read an e-book in the library one has to keep staring at the computer screens which are harmful to the eyes,” said another avid visitor to the library, Amit Pathale while speaking to FPJ.

“However it is the need of the hour that we change our reading and library habits with the advancement in technology,” added Pathale.

Speaking on the issue, a staff member of the Dr Ambedkar library comprising the e-lirary facility, on condition of anonymity said that the library management is hopeful that it would attract many readers.

“The facility had been prepared by since last 4-5 months but it was not being offered to the readers because it was not inaugurated. Before Tuesday we were having constant queries from the readers that when would it be started. They have shown commendable enthusiasm to use the facility. At present it is available only to the members of the library who stands at a figure of around 100. There is no time limit to study the e-books in the library as they are read them for any time they want,” said the staffer.

Sampling innovations in teaching and learning

Bok Center Spring Showcase

Instead of writing a final paper, what if students crafted an art project, complete with artist’s statement, to demonstrate how plants have evolved? Instead of using class time for lectures, what if professors recorded videos for students to watch on their own, to save class time for deeper discussion? Instead of explaining the elements of a musical piece, what if students re-created each component to better understand harmony and composition?

These and other innovative approaches to teaching and learning were on display at the Derek Bok Center for Teaching and Learning’s first showcase on May 12. Held on the third floor of the Science Center, the exhibition displayed approaches and techniques to improve teaching, including more than a dozen projects developed through the center’s new learning lab. Through a series of interactive stations, undergraduates, graduate students, postdoctoral fellows, faculty, and staff explained how they are making Harvard an innovative place to learn.

Now in its second year, the learning lab, supported by a gift of Hartley R. Rogers ’81, M.B.A. ’85, and Amy C. Falls, M.P.P. ’89, makes possible new collaborations and projects, from data visualization to dance. The lab’s suite of rooms is outfitted with high-end digital tools — professional lighting, video cameras, and powerful computers and software — providing resources for professors to reimagine how they teach and vibrant spaces for students to convene and work on projects.

The Bok Center is an intergenerational and interdisciplinary community. “Faculty are hungry,” said Robert Lue, the Richard L. Menschel Faculty Director of the center, “for opportunities to experiment, prototype, and test new ideas in teaching that have the potential to transform the effectiveness of their courses. The learning lab provides a supported environment that not only fosters the creation of these new materials and approaches, but also involves students in their continued development and testing.”

Students, scholars, and staff explore interactive demonstrations, videos, presentations, and exhibits inside the Science Center. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer

Undergraduate fellows who work in the lab serve as shrewd testers of new ideas, offering feedback to faculty. “This co-creative effort brings faculty and students together around learning in ways that further enrich the traditional paradigms of teacher and student,” said Lue. The lab also hosts workshops to train graduate students in media, literacy, and visualization skills, all important aspects of effective teaching. Faculty and teaching fellows can come to the center for help with their challenges, and the learning teams provide a framework for creative solutions.

“Faculty at every level benefit tremendously from the unique resources of the Bok Center,” said Edgerley Family Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences Michael D. Smith. “The learning lab empowers our faculty to pursue forward thinking and creative approaches to teaching and learning, to great effect across campus.”

[Source”indianexpress”]

RIGHT AT HOME: Traditional wing chairs with modern twist

RIGHT AT HOME: Traditional wing chairs with modern twist

No matter how old you are, you might have grown up in a home with a wing chair.

This classic chair dates back a lot farther than any of us, according to Bronia Suszczenia, co-founder of the Yorkshire, England-based interior design firm Art from the Start. “The first wing chair appeared in the late 1600s, but it was not until after 1720 that its popularity became widespread,” she says.

Why the wings? A clue may be in the chair’s alternate name, fireside chair. The idea was that the wings protected you from drafts, while the roomy, upholstered seat was a cozy spot from which to enjoy a cheery blaze.

The wing chair’s enduring appeal is its comfortable, convivial nature, and its usefulness, says New York designer Charlotte Moss.

“It’s the quintessential easy chair. It invites curling up and kicking back,” she says. “And they’re wonderfully versatile. I like to use them at the heads of dining tables, or in a cozy corner with an ottoman, or two facing each other with a fireplace in between.”

Today’s designers are having some fun with this classic style, tweaking its curvy silhouette, going wild or woolly with upholstery, and updating the legs in different colors or materials.

Pottery Barn’s Hayes wing chair, for example, has a barrel-curved back and low-profile arms, so you can tuck your feet up. Leather hues include caramel, forest green, midnight and berry red. The smaller-scaled Manning chair, in a cream-hued fabric, sports chic contemporary button tufting; it’d be a nice choice for a master bedroom. (www.potterybarn.com )

Mitchell Gold and Bob Williams’ Emmet chair hybridizes a wing and club chair. In buttery, aniline leather, it’s a welcoming spot to settle. (www.mgbwhome.com )

At Rove Concepts, Danish modern designer Hans Wegner’s classic Wing chair is offered in leathers and cashmere, tweed and boucle wool. (www.roveconcepts.com )

An exaggerated wingback and arms characterize Wegner’s 1951 Papa chair. He named it for its distinctive sculptural arms, which resemble a big bear’s paws. France and Son offers it in fun midcentury modern hues like orange, teal blue and olive. (www.franceandson.com )

Arne Jacobsen’s iconic Egg chair for Fritz Hansen (available at Design Within Reach) is a biomorphic take on the wing chair; its fluid curves and swivel base have kept it a favorite of modernist aficionados for almost 60 years. (www.dwr.com )

Tom Dixon’s Wingback collection is the British designer’s update on the wing chair and its 18th century cousin, the balloon back. The chairs and sofas have a sexy swagger, in luscious Kvadrat fabric upholstery and ebony or blond oak legs. (www.tomdixon.net )

The angles of Italian midcentury design inspire West Elm’s new Marcelle wing chair, with dramatically scaled aniline leather wings and arms. The Hemming swivel chair nods to classic Danish design, with a low-slung and roomy seat, enveloping high back and wings. Two new colors: rich caramel-toned saddle, and an inky Aegean blue. (www.westelm.com )

Toronto firm Powell & Bonnell’s Chatsworth reading chair takes a different approach. The chair is armless, and sleek planes form the wings, giving the piece an urbane sophistication. (www.powellandbonnell.com )

[Source”indianexpress”]

Volvo to phase out traditional engines

Volvo car, Shanghai Auto Show

Carmaker Volvo has said all new models will have an electric motor from 2019.

The Chinese-owned firm, best known for its emphasis on driver safety, has become the first traditional carmaker to signal the end of the internal combustion engine.

It plans to launch five fully electric models between 2019 and 2021 and a range of hybrid models.

But it will still be manufacturing earlier models that have pure combustion engines.

Geely, Volvo’s Chinese owner, has been quietly pushing ahead with electric car development for more than a decade.

It now aims to sell one million electric cars by 2025.

‘PR coup’

“This announcement marks the end of the solely combustion engine-powered car,” said Hakan Samuelsson, chief executive of Volvo’s carmaking division.

“People increasingly demand electrified cars, and we want to respond to our customers’ current and future needs,” he said.

Tim Urquhart, principal analyst at IHS Automotive, said the move was a “clever sort of PR coup – it is a headline grabber”.

“It is not something that moves the goalposts hugely,” he said.

“Cars launched before that date [of 2019] will still have traditional combustion engines.

“The announcement is significant, and quite impressive, but only in a small way. The hybrids they are promising to make might be mild hybrids, anything as basic as a stop-start system.”

A stop-start system is one where electricity from batteries restart a car’s petrol engine, after it has shut down when the car has come to rest at a junction, or in stationary traffic.

“However, Volvo are probably looking at something more sophisticated than that, but we don’t know what as yet.”

Tesla targets

It comes after US-based electric car firm Tesla announced on Sunday that it will start deliveries of its first mass-market car, the Model 3, at the end of the month.

Elon Musk, Tesla’s founder, said the company was on track to make 20,000 Model 3 cars a month by December.

His company’s rise has upset the traditional power balance of the US car industry.

Tesla, which makes no profits, now has a stock market value of $58bn, nearly one-quarter higher than that of Ford, one of the Detroit giants that has dominated the automotive scene for more than a century.

[Source”indianexpress”]