Reviews roundup: Meet Me in the Bathroom; Eureka; What We Lose

The Strokes – New York’s finest – in January 2006.
 The Strokes – New York’s finest – in January 2006. Photograph: Stephen Lovekin/WireImage

“Every scene needs a chronicler like Lizzy Goodman,” was Jim Carroll’s wholehearted recommendation, in the Irish Times, of Lizzy Goodman’s Meet Me in the Bathroom: Rebirth and Rock and Roll in New York City 2001-2011. The book is “a meaty oral history”, “a wild read” and “strikes all the right notes. As oral histories go, this is one of the very best.” In the Observer, former music journalist Barbara Ellen admired Goodman’s ability “to marshal a veritable army of interviewees who’re not only prepared to talk, but also to gossip, muse, digress, ramble, even bitch and fume, to build the most accurate picture”, making the book “beautifully paced, vivid, informative and compelling”. For the Sunday Times’s Lise Verrico, it was exhaustive at more than 600 pages, and “full of colourful characters, catty comments and incredible candour”.

Anthony Quinn’s novel Eureka also looks back at a swinging time, in this case London in the 1960s, with characters including acid casualty screenwriter Nat Fane. It is part three of a “loosely linked and hugely enjoyable trilogy”, explained Peter Stanford in the Observer, but “works just as well as a standalone”. Stanford found mysteries, wit and entertainment aplenty, but reassured readers: “If Eurekais beginning to sound too clever by half, rather like a 60s counterculture film, what brings it all delightfully together is Quinn’s flawless, easy-going prose. He never once puts a foot wrong either in the wealth of period detail or in giving each well-drawn character their distinctive voice. Clever, certainly, but in just the right measure.” The Mail on Sunday’s Hephzibah Anderson described it as a “pleasingly melancholic romp [which] gallivants towards a dark mystery”, and the Times’s Siobhain Murphy decided that “Quinn’s immersive approach to his historical fiction means we’re soon woozy with the sounds and sights of that significant year”. Not the Daily Mail’s John Harding, though. “[The 60s] are unconvincingly evoked here, with pop music limited to the Beatles and references to Mr Fish fashion and hula hoops feeling tacked on,” he wrote. “The book is padded out with excerpts from Nat’s film script. Let’s hope it never gets made – it’s as flimsy as a go-go dancer’s miniskirt.”

Critics were also divided over the debut novel by Zinzi Clemmons, What We Lose, about a light-skinned black woman living in the US. “Luminescent,” raved Lucy Scholes in the Independent. “Sometimes fierce and angry, other times quiet and tender, it’s a story about identity organised around [a] central, momentous loss – that of a parent – that expands and contracts, as with the beating of a heart, to encompass meditations on race, sex and love … Intelligently and impressively conceived, and beautifully told.” “A memoir trying hard to pass itself off as fiction,” complained Claire Allfree in the Daily Mail. “Clemmons, who shares a lot of biography with her narrator, has a bracingly clear-eyed view on racial politics and the psychological dissonance of living between two cultures, and the tension between her steady prose and turbulent emotions is beautifully sustained. Yet I found it frustrating … Clemmons has yet to make this territory her own.” But the Sunday Times’s Phil Baker was impressed, on balance, finding that “sometimes the result feels like a struggle between grief and pretentiousness, but the frankness and intelligence of the writing win out”.

[Source”cnbc”]

Opinion: What can smart home tech do for retirees?

The most complicated thing on earth isn’t high-technology, it’s family dynamics. A weekend with the in-laws, or a Thanksgiving dinner will provide all the evidence needed. And now that we’re living longer than ever before, the interests and opinions of more generations will compete for the same amount of airtime. The extended life expectancy also increases the need to coordinate long-term financial plans as families navigate mortgages, student loans and long-term care for four living generations. The good news is, there’s hope.

The high-tech craze known as the Internet of Things (IoT) promised the Jetsons lifestyle was only moments away. The reality was decidedly underwhelming. The IoT refers to any device connected to the internet. While some companies added internet connectivity to useful home appliances such as thermostats and door locks, others addressed the less useful combination of internet, such as egg trays and the Wi-Fi juicer.

Focus on needs, not on devices

There are some very useful IoT devices available that help families address the needs of multiple generations. The recommended approach to finding the right device is to identify the root causes of family stressors first, then look for a technology solution.

  • Wellness concerns: It’s difficult to balance a full-time job, an immediate family and manage care for a parent or grandparent. If there is a dark stairwell in the home, installing a motion activated light reduces the risk of a fall. A voice intercom such as the Nucleus, can be a good way to check-in with a family member without visiting their residence. Smart locks are an effective way to grant home access to caregivers or emergency responders.
  • Limited mobility: Simple tasks can become difficult burdens under mobility limitations. Consider a smart home automation hub such as Samsung’s SmartThings and/or a voice-controlled appliance such as Amazon’sAMZN, +0.13% Echo that can be set up to switch lights on or off, lock doors, set reminders and even water a garden.
  • Medications: Managing medications is a top concern of family caregivers. A connected pillbox can be a great way to gain insight into medication adherence without bothering the family member daily. These pillboxes can be simple, such as Tricella’s Pillbox, or fancy such as the HERO.
  • Monthly bills: Home energy consumption can be volatile and difficult to manage. Smart appliances such as Google’s GOOG, +1.26% Nest can pay for itself in energy savings by managing HVAC routines based on user activity.
Herohealth.com
A smart pill box manages medications and keeps toddlers out.

Some of these devices may be familiar, and great solutions to specific issues. But what if the need is broader than one or two specific concerns? What if, for example, mom’s goal is to live at home as long as possible, but her children worry that the home won’t provide the support she needs? The solution is to connect the individual devices to a platform that offers insights valuable to each member in the family.

When it comes to retirement, 60s are the new 50s
The whole is greater than the sum of its parts

While simple smart home devices can meet some goals for independent living, unless they work together they cannot address the situations that would otherwise undermine a family’s support of an older member’s decision to age-in-place. Take the motion activated light from above; its one function is to turn on the stairway light. When additional motion sensors are added in the home, the information from each sensor can be stitched together to make more meaningful insights, such as where the resident has been and how much time was spent in each room.

That’s a meaningful step toward unlocking the value promised from the IoT hype, but it’s not quite there. An analysis and alert service such as HoneyCo’s Internet of Caring Things (IoCT), completes the process. HoneyCo’s IoCT proactively alerts family members or professional caregivers of concerning activity, such as too much time at the bottom of that dark stairwell.

Game-changer

Residential care facilities were considered an unavoidable part of the transition from adulthood to elderhood. The broad sentiment was that nobody wanted to go, but we’d all end up there at some point, even if our kids forced us into it. Smart home technology is transforming this concept. The retirement communities of the future will be the homes we live in today. Care will be coordinated through the IoCT, driverless cars will shuttle members to social events, and we’ll reflect on how technology spared us from the anxieties of elderhood and allowed multiple generations to build meaningful relationships.

Zachary Watson is the Founder & CEO of HoneyCo Homes.

 

 

[Source”cnbc”]

Without Understanding What Traditional Knowledge Is, We Cannot Utilize It Appropriately

KAMPALA — For a long time, traditional knowledge and traditional cultural expressions were timidly recognised as intellectual efforts worthy of legal protection. Of recent, indigenous peoples, local communities, and some governments have demanded the recognition of traditional forms of creativity and innovation as protectable intellectual property.

Sculpture depicting traditional homestead activities

Because traditional knowledge is considered as part of the public domain, it raises key issues as to how it can be protected so as to serve the interests of traditional communities, states, as well as the users.

To raise more awareness, the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) and Uganda Registration Services Bureau (URSB) conducted a Traditional Knowledge as Intellectual Property for Economic Development Workshop in Kampala last week. The workshop had participants from Uganda, Kenya, Malawi, Zanzibar, South Africa and Ghana.

The objective of the workshop was to “sensitise, engage and facilitate national dialogue on Intellectual Property (IP) and Traditional Knowledge (TK), Traditional Cultural Expressions (TCEs) and Genetic Resources (GR) as a first step to develop a national policy or strategy on technical knowledge to be integrated into the recently validated national IP policy,” according to the workshop agenda paper.

The country’s National IP Policy was validated in Kampala earlier in the year, and is now awaiting approval from the Uganda cabinet.

WIPO defines TK as a living body of knowledge that is developed, sustained and passed on from generation to generation within a community. It often forms part of a people’s cultural and spiritual identity.

Uganda, according to the Uganda National Culture Policy, is endowed with a rich and diverse cultural heritage, which includes 65 indigenous communities with unique characteristics. The diversity contributes to a wealth of indigenous knowledge, languages, folklore, customs and traditions and products that can be harnessed for development.

Two legislative acts directly address the legislation of TK in Uganda.

According to the Uganda Copyright and Neighbouring Rights Act, TK and folklore are part of works eligible for copyright protection.

The other legislation for TK is mentioned in the Industrial Property Act, Section 21 (8), which calls for a mandatory disclosure requirement for all innovations that seek to be protected, “including any element of traditional knowledge associated or not with those resources.”

Agaba Gilbert, the IP manager at URSB, in his presentation titled“Intellectual Property and Traditional Knowledge and Traditional Cultural Expressions,” added that TCE works protected by copyright include verbal expressions, musical expressions and expressions by action.

Others are tangible expressions such as productions of art, in particular, drawings, designs, paintings, carvings, sculptures, pottery, terracotta, mosaic, woodwork, metalware, jewellery, baskets, needlework, textiles, glassware, carpets, costumes; handicrafts; musical instruments; and architectural forms.

The Ugandan law is vague however, according to Anthony Kakooza: “It does not provide for ownership of traditional cultural expressions (TCEs) nor does it state how such works can be identified or how such protection can be implemented”. Kakooza is the dean, Faculty of Law, Uganda Christian University, and a researcher in IP.

“It is also erroneous in ranking TCEs as ‘eligible for copyright’ and yet they lack a clearly identifiable origin; have no defined ownership; and no ascertained duration unlike recognised works of copyright,” Kakooza added.

Case Study

In the run-up to the 2011 presidential elections in Uganda, presidential candidate Yoweri Museveni released a hip-hop rap song, intended to appeal to youthful voters. The Museveni team went ahead and applied to register the song, ‘You Want Another Rap,’ for copyright protection.

Two members of the public contested the application, stating that: the work is in the public domain free for all to use; the applicant has not made any improvement on the poems; the applicant merely recited the poem as an act of performance; and that the work constitutes public property and the application is an abuse of intellectual property.

Museveni’s counsel countered that the president is only applying to protect his derivative expression “rather than restrict the use of earlier and differently expressed versions.”

This matter is the first legal contestation over property rights in folklore in Uganda, Kakooza said in his thesis titled, “The Cultural Divide: Traditional Cultural Expressions and the Entertainment Industry in Developing Economies.”

One of the challenges faced by developing countries in exploiting their TK and TCEs is inadequate data on these. Such governments, including Uganda, do not have the statistics. Documenting TK and TCEs has emerged as one of the tools which may play a role in impeding further loss of TK, maintaining TK over time, supporting benefit-sharing and, ultimately, protecting TK and TCEs from unwanted uses.

There’s also the challenge of administering TK and TCEs over cross-border communities. Like Uganda, most communities were split up during boundary demarcations by the colonial governments.

Unlike IP, there’s no individual ownership and ascertainable durability in TK and TCEs.

According to Naana Halm, an IP expert and legal researcher, communities need to pinpoint certain aspects of IP protection to protect TK and TCEs on larger scales in order to reach international markets. Halm was presenting a paper titled: “The role of IP in promoting and commercialising products based on TK and TCEs.”

According to Wend Wendland, director, WIPO TK Division, there’s a need to reconcile competing policy objectives. This can be achieved by respecting dignity of indigenous communities, promoting cultural exchange, fostering creativity and the cultural industries, reserving cultural heritage, and propelling socio-economic development of communities.

To address the needs of the different parties, Kakooza advocates for: preservation of culture using an archival base, educational institutions, museums and cultural centres; negotiated use of TCEs over issues such as economic and moral rights, as well as respecting sacred rites; developing a partnership for TCE usage with key partners being the state and traditional communities, and encouraging creative content.

The Nagoya Protocol on Access to Genetic Resources and the Fair and Equitable Sharing of Benefits Arising from their Utilization to the Convention on Biological Diversity (2010), as well as ongoing negotiations within the WIPO Intergovernmental Committee on Genetic Resources and Intellectual Property, Genetic Resources and Folklore (IGC) to design an international instrument(s) for the protection of TK and TCEs, are recent reflections of an explicit commitment by the international community to protect the intellectual rights of indigenous peoples and local communities.

[Source”timesofindia”]

 

Without Understanding What Traditional Knowledge Is, We Cannot Utilize It Appropriately

KAMPALA — For a long time, traditional knowledge and traditional cultural expressions were timidly recognised as intellectual efforts worthy of legal protection. Of recent, indigenous peoples, local communities, and some governments have demanded the recognition of traditional forms of creativity and innovation as protectable intellectual property.

Because traditional knowledge is considered as part of the public domain, it raises key issues as to how it can be protected so as to serve the interests of traditional communities, states, as well as the users.

To raise more awareness, the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) and Uganda Registration Services Bureau (URSB) conducted a Traditional Knowledge as Intellectual Property for Economic Development Workshop in Kampala last week. The workshop had participants from Uganda, Kenya, Malawi, Zanzibar, South Africa and Ghana.

The objective of the workshop was to “sensitise, engage and facilitate national dialogue on Intellectual Property (IP) and Traditional Knowledge (TK), Traditional Cultural Expressions (TCEs) and Genetic Resources (GR) as a first step to develop a national policy or strategy on technical knowledge to be integrated into the recently validated national IP policy,” according to the workshop agenda paper.

The country’s National IP Policy was validated in Kampala earlier in the year, and is now awaiting approval from the Uganda cabinet.

WIPO defines TK as a living body of knowledge that is developed, sustained and passed on from generation to generation within a community. It often forms part of a people’s cultural and spiritual identity.

Uganda, according to the Uganda National Culture Policy, is endowed with a rich and diverse cultural heritage, which includes 65 indigenous communities with unique characteristics. The diversity contributes to a wealth of indigenous knowledge, languages, folklore, customs and traditions and products that can be harnessed for development.

Two legislative acts directly address the legislation of TK in Uganda.

According to the Uganda Copyright and Neighbouring Rights Act, TK and folklore are part of works eligible for copyright protection.

The other legislation for TK is mentioned in the Industrial Property Act, Section 21 (8), which calls for a mandatory disclosure requirement for all innovations that seek to be protected, “including any element of traditional knowledge associated or not with those resources.”

Agaba Gilbert, the IP manager at URSB, in his presentation titled“Intellectual Property and Traditional Knowledge and Traditional Cultural Expressions,” added that TCE works protected by copyright include verbal expressions, musical expressions and expressions by action.

Others are tangible expressions such as productions of art, in particular, drawings, designs, paintings, carvings, sculptures, pottery, terracotta, mosaic, woodwork, metalware, jewellery, baskets, needlework, textiles, glassware, carpets, costumes; handicrafts; musical instruments; and architectural forms.

The Ugandan law is vague however, according to Anthony Kakooza: “It does not provide for ownership of traditional cultural expressions (TCEs) nor does it state how such works can be identified or how such protection can be implemented”. Kakooza is the dean, Faculty of Law, Uganda Christian University, and a researcher in IP.

“It is also erroneous in ranking TCEs as ‘eligible for copyright’ and yet they lack a clearly identifiable origin; have no defined ownership; and no ascertained duration unlike recognised works of copyright,” Kakooza added.

Case Study

In the run-up to the 2011 presidential elections in Uganda, presidential candidate Yoweri Museveni released a hip-hop rap song, intended to appeal to youthful voters. The Museveni team went ahead and applied to register the song, ‘You Want Another Rap,’ for copyright protection.

Two members of the public contested the application, stating that: the work is in the public domain free for all to use; the applicant has not made any improvement on the poems; the applicant merely recited the poem as an act of performance; and that the work constitutes public property and the application is an abuse of intellectual property.

Museveni’s counsel countered that the president is only applying to protect his derivative expression “rather than restrict the use of earlier and differently expressed versions.”

This matter is the first legal contestation over property rights in folklore in Uganda, Kakooza said in his thesis titled, “The Cultural Divide: Traditional Cultural Expressions and the Entertainment Industry in Developing Economies.”

One of the challenges faced by developing countries in exploiting their TK and TCEs is inadequate data on these. Such governments, including Uganda, do not have the statistics. Documenting TK and TCEs has emerged as one of the tools which may play a role in impeding further loss of TK, maintaining TK over time, supporting benefit-sharing and, ultimately, protecting TK and TCEs from unwanted uses.

There’s also the challenge of administering TK and TCEs over cross-border communities. Like Uganda, most communities were split up during boundary demarcations by the colonial governments.

Unlike IP, there’s no individual ownership and ascertainable durability in TK and TCEs.

According to Naana Halm, an IP expert and legal researcher, communities need to pinpoint certain aspects of IP protection to protect TK and TCEs on larger scales in order to reach international markets. Halm was presenting a paper titled: “The role of IP in promoting and commercialising products based on TK and TCEs.”

According to Wend Wendland, director, WIPO TK Division, there’s a need to reconcile competing policy objectives. This can be achieved by respecting dignity of indigenous communities, promoting cultural exchange, fostering creativity and the cultural industries, reserving cultural heritage, and propelling socio-economic development of communities.

To address the needs of the different parties, Kakooza advocates for: preservation of culture using an archival base, educational institutions, museums and cultural centres; negotiated use of TCEs over issues such as economic and moral rights, as well as respecting sacred rites; developing a partnership for TCE usage with key partners being the state and traditional communities, and encouraging creative content.

The Nagoya Protocol on Access to Genetic Resources and the Fair and Equitable Sharing of Benefits Arising from their Utilization to the Convention on Biological Diversity (2010), as well as ongoing negotiations within the WIPO Intergovernmental Committee on Genetic Resources and Intellectual Property, Genetic Resources and Folklore (IGC) to design an international instrument(s) for the protection of TK and TCEs, are recent reflections of an explicit commitment by the international community to protect the intellectual rights of indigenous peoples and local communities.

WHAT ARE THE MOST IMPORTANT ASPECTS OF INTRUDER ALARMS AND FIRE SYSTEMS?

Any sales person will quickly tell you all the latest technological advances that are available through the intruder alarms and fire systems their company has to offer. The list of features and capabilities possessed by modern security and safety systems is quite impressive. We have systems that operate automatic audio and video whenever an intruder is detected. Others set off remote alarms, there are others that will trigger exit and entrance lock downs that hold intruders captive and so much more. Wireless burglar alarms are also becoming increasingly popular.

While all these features and capabilities are obviously great to have, there are two core aspects of a security system that must be delivered by your provider regardless of the levels of sophistication or simplicity in the systems they have to offer. These two core aspects are monitoring and maintenance. If your security services provider fails in the effective delivery of either one of these core aspects, the security system they sell to you is simply a modern day scarecrow.

Monitoring
All security issues are time sensitive. The timely response to any threat or concern depends on how fast people become aware of the particular incident. It is completely useless to have your state of the art equipment detect an intrusion instantly, yet response to the incident will come much later. Your service provider must have the resources to constantly monitor your system and immediately respond to any concerns in an appropriate manner. This should not happen some times and neither should it happen most of the time, it should happen all of the time!

Maintenance
As with all systems and equipment, regular maintenance and testing of your security installations is the only way to make sure that everything is working as expected. Routine checks are very important as they effectively deal with problems before they arise. A good service provider should also have a 24 hour service team available for clients who have technical issues at any time of day or night. Your hardware and software issues must be resolved as soon as they are detected since they may be part of a security breach in the progress.

As you go out shopping for security and fire alarm systems for your home or business, remember to fully address these two important aspects. If the provider cannot satisfactorily deliver when it comes to monitoring and maintenance, move on until you get a company that can guarantee effective delivery on both.

 

 
[Source:- broadswordsecurity]

How to care for your orchids: maintenance tips and what not to do

Three different types of orchid: (left-right): Phalaenopsis, Paphiopedilum and Vanda.

There are over 25,000 types of orchids, and contrary to popular belief, they are extremely easy to look after.

To a certain degree, the orchid actually appreciates negligence, and while bringing instant colour to your home, with the right care, they can give a long-lasting flower display. Get some top maintenance tips below, including how to make your orchids last longer.

GENERAL CARE AND MAINTENANCE

Is your orchid shedding its flowers, or has it turned yellow and limp? Find a solution below to these common ailments. 

Problem: If your orchid sheds flowers or flower butts, this is an indication that your plant hasn’t got enough water or sunlight.

Solution: Give it a more luminous surrounding, and soak its roots once a week.

Problem: Yellow leaves can be caused by exposing your orchid to too much sunlight.

Solution: Place your orchid in light surroundings, but not in direct sunlight e.g. a side table near the window would be the perfect location.

Problem: Limp leaves are indicative of a water deficiency or, in contrary, water excess. If the orchid’s roots are grey, this means your orchid is suffering from water deprivation.

Solution: It’s best to soak your orchid in a bucket or sink for 10 to 15 minutes. If the orchid roots are brown, this indicates that your orchid was given too much water. Sometimes, the orchid will grow new roots (after its bloom).


3 WAYS TO MAKE YOUR ORCHIDS LAST LONGER

  1. Place your orchid in a bright place but refrain from placing it in direct sunlight.
  2. Water it once a week, you can do this by dipping its roots into a bucket or sink, just ensure you let it drain properly before putting it back into its pot. In winter, it’s best to water it every 10 days.
  3. Prolong its bloom by giving it plant food once a month.

WHAT NOT TO DO…

  • Orchids dislike a slight draft, direct sunlight, and being in hot conditions.
  • Refrain from placing the orchid near a fruit bowl too as the fruit bowls produce gases that have a deteriorating effect on flowers.

 

[Source:- Housebeautiful]

Residing with Lexington e book extract: ‘What coloration method to me’

Living with Lexington bedroom

What colour manner to me

colour approach the entirety. one of a kind shades generate special moods. it is easy to trade a room through color, and to create a specific ecosystem with the right coloration. creating a sense of calm and concord in a room is fundamental; then extraordinary hues may be used to enlarge the room’s character.

shade has always stimulated me. i am someone who can keep small colour samples, really because I think they are so exceptional. i can make them into patterns, and integrate them just for fun. I truly like all colors, and it is so excellent that with one’s favourites there are limitless possible combinations. The equal colorations look absolutely new when blended with a brand new coloration.

What could life be without color? perhaps a chunk less complicated, but virtually extra dull. using colour is a way to affect and layout our surroundings. via the use of various colours, we can create completely exclusive moods as well as awesome variety inside the design of rooms.

To me, it is essential for colors to offer a experience of calm and harmony. A white background is my favorite, but it can not be allowed to make matters look cold.
maximum popular

indoors design requires a distinct palette of colors. blending too many makes the room appearance jumbled and creates a feel of restlessness. A coherent colour palette also creates opportunities for variation, the usage of one-of-a-kind accessory colors.
residing with Lexington bed room

Brigitta Wolfgang Bjørnvad / residing with Lexington

My basis colorations

basis coloration #1 — WHITE

White and light colorations are my basis. it’s no longer constantly essential to begin with shiny white, that can every now and then be too harsh. it is better to pick out an off-white with a chunk of gold or grey instead. i take advantage of an off-white colour as a foundation plenty — we name it snow white.

bear in mind portray take a look at areas within the room if you’ll be the use of shiny white or off-white with elements of gold or gray. The light inside the room is decisive to how it will look. White may additionally look mild yellow or grey, relying at the lighting fixtures inside the room. Paint a small location in the room and notice how it’s far tormented by the mild. understand that mild moves unique partitions in exceptional ways, so it is probably a great concept to test the paint out on more than one wall.

basis color number 2 — BLUE

My different basis color is blue, in all its colours. Blue and white is a conventional — you by no means get uninterested in this mixture. Stripes, checks, plant life, photo prints — you may integrate anything if the colours are matched right.

My desire for blue comes principally from the ocean and sky. The variety of blue colorations is inexhaustible. there are such a lot of sun shades to pick from. team up blue shades with other colorations. This makes an elegant impact.

remember that even light-blue hues look dark on big surfaces. Combining severa one-of-a-kind sun shades of blue produces a very satisfactory impact, however it’s critical for them to shape a harmonious whole.

foundation shade range 3 — BEIGE

Beige is a non-shade to a variety of humans. I assume that emphasising beige may be lovely: while joined with different colours, it creates a feel of calm and harmony. a totally white room can be harsh, but it softens a extraordinary deal if you mix white and beige. Camel and caramel are exciting versions of beige. They can be mixed with white, and provide a piece greater contrast than a lighter beige.

do not be terrified of letting the beige shades lean closer to the darker give up of the dimensions. This adds weight and concord to white. when the usage of light beige colours, make certain they don’t lean an excessive amount of in the direction of pink or inexperienced. another time, the mild in the room is extraordinarily important to how color is perceived.
living with Lexington spring mattress with gray shade scheme

Brigitta Wolfgang Bjørnvad / dwelling with Lexington

foundation shade variety fourgray

gray is an alternative to beige. It makes a more subdued influence, however on occasion it is able to seem a piece bloodless. In the ones cases it’s better to select beige. grey also offers a conventional feeling, and it tones down the marine appearance of blue and white if that’s what you want. Blue, gray, and white lend elegance to decor.

I additionally assume that you may blend grey and beige. this does not paintings for numerous human beings, however if you discover sun shades that paintings harmoniously together, it makes a subdued and stylish impact.

grey creates a experience of beauty. it’s great to combine specific greys collectively. pick out a dark charcoal grey rather than black if you want a clearly darkish hue — it creates a miles extra subdued feeling. grey is extraordinarily first-class in fabric that soak up mild in different ways, which include velvet. a grey velvet pillow on a white couch right away makes the sofa fashionable.

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foundation colour wide variety 5purple
dwelling with Lexington pink striped desk cowl

Carl Johan Rönn / residing with Lexington
most popular

crimson is the foundation coloration that i use the least. purple has so many institutionseverything from an apparent summer hue to the colour that includes an entire season, namely, Christmas. Even if you need to take it easy with pink, it’s nonetheless part of my foundation — what could the yank flag be without pink?

including red in a adorning detail in a room is placing. It is probably a carpentry detail painted crimson, a pillow, or something else. move crazy with pink accessory merchandise all through the season — why not incorporate numerous varieties of pink at Christmas rather than just traditional Christmas red?
living with Lexington colored striped patterned seaside towels

dwelling with Lexington

accent hues

there are numerous accent colours, and people we’re attracted to differ from season to season.

YELLOW — in every coloration from butter, solar, and lemon-yellow to orange and caramel — is powerful and creates a experience of warmth.

green — from tea, grass, or leaves to pine inexperiencedpresents a feel of calm.

red — from infant to bubblegum — may be flirty or soft.

BROWN AND BLACK — from earth to ash — they add weight and gravitas.

by starting with foundation colorations, you may create endless versions based totally at the season, fashion, or just your temper. With a mild foundation it is clean to discover totally new opportunities on a small price range. Pillows or throws in a brand new shade rework the residing room into a totally new space. A tablecloth, napkins, and clean plant life in a vase rework a equipped-laid table into an experience.

There are actually no guidelines or barriers for accent shades. follow your feelings and wishes. strive things out and spot what happens.

Alan Titchmarsh: What do you call your sitting room?

The White Drawing Room, at Buckingham Palace

Learning the names that families use for their sitting room has offered plenty of amusement over the past couple of weeks.

Much seems to depend on the part of the country and the social aspiration of the household. Her Majesty the Queen, at Buckingham Palace, has a White Drawing Room , so clearly “drawing room” is an upmarket description of what we referred to as “the front room” when I was growing up in a terrace house in Yorkshire.

I confess to using the term on occasion in our current house, convincing myself that I can do so because we live in a Georgian farmhouse, and that would have been the term back then. I call it “the sitting room” when I forget to put on airs.

The White Drawing Room
The White Drawing Room Credit: Rex

My daughters bring me down to earth by calling it “the posh room”; to distinguish it from the room with the telly, where we sit on the floppy sofa when we have supper on our laps.

In 1965, when I was 16, we moved from the terrace house with “the front room and the back kitchen” to a pebble-dashed semi. It, too, had a front room, but it was then known as “the lounge”, and we even had a ceramic tile on its door to indicate as much. “Living room” is, I suppose, devoid of any class associations and is, at least, honest in its description.

In Yorkshire, rooms are given names that clearly describe their function and content. I vividly remember, when growing up, hearing a conversation between two of my grandmother’s neighbours. “We’ve just decorated our cloakroom,” said one; to which the other, with an identical house, replied: “Oh, aye? Well, we’ve just distempered the junk ’ole.”

A loft/attic
Loft or attic? Credit: Alamy

Nowadays there is little talk of sculleries and kitchenettes; attics are “lofts” and cellars are basements, unless they contain wine. Half of London, it seems, is due to suffer subsidence any time now, thanks to the demand for gyms and cinemas or, rather more upmarket, “screening rooms” underneath houses that were built without a lower ground floor.

Sheds are “studios” or “garden rooms” and toilets are “loos” in middle-class houses or “lavatories” in stately homes. Only in the US are they “rest rooms’, and it makes me smile when a visitor to our house asks for “the bathroom”, as though they were intent on having a good soak.

Anyway, must dash. I’m on my way through the loggia to take tea on the terrace. Patio? No, thanks.

[Source:- Telegraph]