Ireland recycled equivalent of 15m household appliances in 2016

Large household appliances remain a consistently high-performing category, representing 49 per cent of all WEEE collected last year.

Irish consumers recycled 34,482 tonnes of waste electrical and electronic equipment during 2016; the equivalent of approximately 15 million household appliances or almost 10kg per person. The figures, the highest ever achieved, are confirmed in the 2016 annual report from Waste, Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE) Ireland, published Thursday.

WEEE Ireland is a not-for-profit organisation, founded by producers of electrical and electronic appliances to help them comply with the legal obligations imposed by the EU directives.

The report shows that WEEE Ireland has exceeded EU targets, representing an increase of 12 per cent from 2015 when 30,909 tonnes were collected.

A revised target of 65 per cent “takeback” of all WEEE placed on the market by 2019 is in place. “This new target must be achieved to maintain Ireland’s exemplary status in WEEE recycling,” said WEEE Ireland chief executive Leo Donovan.

2016 was the “year of the battery”, he said – as an additional 812 tonnes of batteries were collected; the equivalent of 32 million AA batteries.

The report shows marked growth in takeback of waste electrical toys, which grew by 140 per cent and electrical tools, which grew by 122 per cent. Refrigeration appliances were another high performing category, with Irish consumers recycling 103,000 fridges/freezers with WEEE Ireland last year. Large household appliances remain a consistently high-performing category, representing 49 per cent of all WEEE collected last year.

Gold standard

WEEE Ireland co-ordinates collections of electronic waste via retailers, civic amenity sites and its collection events. It works on behalf of its member producers to help them meet and comply with obligations imposed by the WEEE Directive. Apple Distribution, Dell, Panasonic, Philips, Whirlpool, Glen Dimplex and IBM Ireland are among 912 members who collectively placed 56,000 tonnes of electrical and electronic equipment on the Irish market last year.

The collection of waste electrical and electronic equipment “has gone from strength to strength” Mr Donovan added. Ireland “now sets the gold standard in WEEE recycling for one of the best performing small country in Europe as acknowledged by the EU Commission”.

[Source”pcworld”]

One of the dumbest political mistakes in the modern era

One of the dumbest political mistakes in the modern era

 Story image for Modern from Washington Post

Alex Brandon / Axios

President Trump’s firing of FBI Director James Comey is rightly seen as a terrific legal blunder: He undercut an investigation that might have shown he never colluded with the Russians, and spawned one that could result in obstruction of justice charges.

Why it matters: Regardless of the legal outcome, it’ll go down as one of the dumbest political mistakes in the modern era. One of the president’s outside advisers calls it the gravest political mistake since Richard Nixon decided not to apologize to the American people for Watergate, and instead proceeded with the cover-up.

“The Russia investigation is now the central narrative of the Trump administration, no matter what he does,” the adviser said. “He wanted to be a disruptive force for change, and now he’s stuck in the quicksand of the swamp.”
Trump himself has suggested to friends that he understands the bind he created: By taunting Comey about tapes that the president admitted yesterday don’t exist, he hastened the chain of events that led to the appointment of special counsel Bob Mueller, who’s expected to delve into the business affairs of the president and his family.
In retrospect, if Trump had kept Comey and stopped obsessing about his investigation, his legal troubles might have blown over: No evidence of collusion has emerged. As David Brooks pointed out in one of the better columns of the month, it’s striking how little has surfaced on the collusion front, given the gush of anti-Trump leaks.
Trump would be standing here today with a perfect record on contested special elections, a strong stock market, low unemployment and momentum heading into the tax reform debate. Instead, Trump’s impulsive decision — made against the advice of several trusted advisers — has:
  1. Consumed Trump: In phone calls, staff meetings and tweets, the president rages about Mueller. This often pushes aside conversation about his legislative agenda, executive actions and planned messages.
  2. Trapped Trump: The Russia probe has now mushroomed into one that includes obstruction of justice, adding a self-created investigation that will eat up precious time for months or years to come.
  3. Tainted Trump: Polls show the vast majority voters disapprove of his handling of Comey and Russia. More importantly, Republicans inclined to believe he didn’t collude with the Russians seem quite willing to believe he might have obstructed justice after canning Comey.
  4. Stalled Trump: He was hardly cooking with grease on the legislative front pre-Comey. Now, White House officials think they will be lucky to end 2017 with any substantial bills signed into law.
  5. Tagged Trump for 2020: If he runs again, Democrats can be expected to turn the firing, probes, and attacks on the special prosecutor into centerpieces of the case against Trump.                                                           [Source”pcworld”]

Out of Africa: Furniture and accessories gallery

Patrizia Moroso's celebrated m'Afrique collection was launched in 2009, and new pieces have been added over time. Kiwis ...

Patrizia Moroso’s celebrated m’Afrique collection was launched in 2009, and new pieces have been added over time. Kiwis looking for a splash of bright colour and imaginative design can find m’Afrique items at Matisse.

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In 2009, celebrated Italian furniture manufacturer Moroso launched the m’Afrique collection – a group of outdoor furniture designed by some of the biggest names in contemporary design, using sustainably sourced materials, hand-made in African communities.

Patrizia Moroso is the creative director of her family’s eponymous company and one of the most influential names in contemporary furniture.

Moroso’s husband, Senegalese artist and designer Abdou Salam Gaye, was

[Source”pcworld”]

Stand-alone Call of Duty: Modern Warfare Remastered could go on sale next week

all of Duty: Modern Warfare Remastered, the remake of the 2007 classic that came bundled with last year’s Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare, may be getting a stand-alone version. A call to Target puts the the current street date for the unannounced title at June 27.

The story began yesterday over on Charlie Intel. It received a tip in the form of pictures showing a shrink-wrapped version of Modern Warfare Remastered for PlayStation 4 as well as an image of a Target shelf tag listing the price as $39.99. Later that day, a reader sent in a picture of the Target computer system listing the game’s street date as June 20.

Polygon called several Targets in the Chicagoland area for more information. Several employees confirmed that they had a listing for a product that matched the SKU given to Charlie Intel. They could confirm that it was a video game, and that the street date was June 27. However, all other information on the product listing was redacted. One employee said this is common practice internally at Target for new titles entering the computer system prior to their street date.

Polygon has reached out to Activision for more information.

Last year’s Infinite Warfare didn’t achieve the kind of success at retail that Activision had hoped for. Fan reaction to the game, which took the series to outer space in the far future, was extremely negative when the first trailer was released on YouTube. Later, Activision admitted that the game “underperformed” and that the setting “just didn’t resonate” with players.

Modern Warfare Remastered has seen continued support from Activision, including new character models and new weapons.

The next Call of Duty title is called Call of Duty: WWII and will tell the story of the U.S. Army’s 1st Infantry Division. We had hands-on the game’s multiplayer mode at this year’s E3. The title is expected to be released on November 3 for PlayStation 4, Windows PC and Xbox One.

[Source”pcworld”]

Stand-alone Call of Duty: Modern Warfare Remastered could go on sale next week

Call of Duty: Modern Warfare Remastered, the remake of the 2007 classic that came bundled with last year’s Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare, may be getting a stand-alone version. A call to Target puts the the current street date for the unannounced title at June 27.

The story began yesterday over on Charlie Intel. It received a tip in the form of pictures showing a shrink-wrapped version of Modern Warfare Remastered for PlayStation 4 as well as an image of a Target shelf tag listing the price as $39.99. Later that day, a reader sent in a picture of the Target computer system listing the game’s street date as June 20.

Polygon called several Targets in the Chicagoland area for more information. Several employees confirmed that they had a listing for a product that matched the SKU given to Charlie Intel. They could confirm that it was a video game, and that the street date was June 27. However, all other information on the product listing was redacted. One employee said this is common practice internally at Target for new titles entering the computer system prior to their street date.

Polygon has reached out to Activision for more information.

Last year’s Infinite Warfare didn’t achieve the kind of success at retail that Activision had hoped for. Fan reaction to the game, which took the series to outer space in the far future, was extremely negative when the first trailer was released on YouTube. Later, Activision admitted that the game “underperformed” and that the setting “just didn’t resonate” with players.

Modern Warfare Remastered has seen continued support from Activision, including new character models and new weapons.

The next Call of Duty title is called Call of Duty: WWII and will tell the story of the U.S. Army’s 1st Infantry Division. We had hands-on the game’s multiplayer mode at this year’s E3. The title is expected to be released on November 3 for PlayStation 4, Windows PC and Xbox One.

 [Source”timesofindia”]

The beauty and ecological benefits of a garden in decay

gardening-1.jpg

Spring is not a moment in the garden but a sequence, a gentle unfurling of plant life that grows fuller by the day at a tempo that is almost out of sync with human perception.

One minute perennials are peeping out of the earth, and the next the soil is covered by fully grown greenery. The fall is the same way, except the movement is in reverse. With each passing week between early October and Thanksgiving, more perennials, grasses, groundcovers and the stuff of the lower layers of the garden will shrink, darken and start to lie down. Because our gaze is fixed on the changing leaf colors of the trees and shrubs, this other show occurs at a more subconscious level, but the two are related and deserve to be enjoyed together.

Where once the odd coneflower looked dried in the flower beds, other plants follow the same course, until there is a wholesale shift in the character of the garden from repletion to decline and seediness.

We are wired to see decay as rot, and rot as a threat to our well-being. So when we take stock of the autumn landscape, especially after a killing frost, our instinct is to clean it all up. This is a mistake on a number of levels.

The withering of the top growth of perennials and grasses is not a pernicious thing, but a natural part of their life cycle. They will re-sprout afresh in the spring from their crown buds. This year’s declining growth, meanwhile, is likely to be full of the very stuff of life, ripening seed.

I think – I hope – that our gardens are becoming more lavishly and dynamically planted with perennials and grasses, and with an ecological bent. If so, this fall conundrum will only become more pressing.

I see this decay as something beautiful, the way a steel panel becomes patinated with surface rust. So my approach to garden grooming in the fall is to remove obvious blight – shriveled hosta leaves, for example, along with diseased foliage – but to let anything else stand through the fall and winter as long as it isn’t an eyesore.

I particularly like the effect of the black stalks and seed heads of rudbeckias, from the knee-high black-eyed Susans to the taller giant coneflower. Composites as a rule make for handsome zombies, especially the purple coneflowers. The tall, wiry cup plant is lovely in its deterioration. Asters, too, are attractive in the dead months, especially when the fluffy, downy seeds make a break for it. Other effective perennials include amsonias, calamintha, perovskia and swamp milkweed. Need it be said, this is the time of year when all the ornamental grasses come into their own, green or brown, including the native bluestems, panicums and prairie drop seed.

If you want icing on this cake, nature provides it in the dewdrops of October and the ice crystals of November and December. The latter is a phenomenon called riming, and although the mid-Atlantic isn’t perhaps the best climatic region for this, when it happens you should take a moment to savor it. The most dramatic display of riming I saw was about four years ago in England, where a whole woodland beyond a field was frosted. It was like observing a finely crafted black-and-white art photo, but in negative. Such morning scenes, in miniature, await the untidy gardener.

There is an equally compelling argument for not weed-whacking and clearing the ornamental beds at this time of year, or the leaf litter that is obsessively blown, gathered and bagged in November. This detritus provides vital shelter and nourishment for wildlife. Doug Tallamy, author of a landmark book about ecological gardening, “Bringing Nature Home,” sees a direct link between the decline of fireflies and the modern-day fixation with leaf blowing. “Fireflies spend their entire larval life in the litter,” he said. “They are only adults for a short period.” Tallamy, a professor of entomology at the University of Delaware, is also co-author of “The Living Landscape.”

When we cut back the seed heads and stalks, we deprive birds and small mammals of seeds. “I always encourage people, if they have seed-producing plants such as black-eyed Susans, purple coneflowers or goldenrods, to leave them up because the overwintering birds really rely on them,” said Deborah Landau, an ecologist with the Maryland/D.C. chapter of the Nature Conservancy.

Neatniks also harm countless species of beneficial insects. Landau said other casualties include the egg masses of such creatures as praying mantises and spiders. The former resembles a hardened foam mass enveloping a stem; the latter looks like a string of pearls.

Many native bee species spend the winter as pupae within the pithy stems of perennials and the canes of hydrangeas, Tallamy said. “Much of the insect community is spending winter in that debris we get rid of all the time,” he said. One option for appearance’s sake is to cut back material in the front yard but leave dead top growth standing in less-visible parts of the garden, he said. Stalks and leaves that must be cut can be stored elsewhere outside, but don’t lay them down. The snow will flatten a pile and it will rot, he said.

Landau said these undisturbed beds also provide shelter for frogs and salamanders (and presumably a third amphibian, the toad).

Also, this debris is home to butterflies. I was in the Smithsonian’s Ripley Garden the other day, and it was Grand Central for monarch butterflies – adults, caterpillars and even pupae. If it stays warm, the chrysalises will hatch soon and the butterflies will head south. But other butterflies spend the winter here in their cocoons, and the pipevine plants were loaded with pipevine swallowtail caterpillars eating their way into a pupal stage, to emerge as adults next year.

“The less disturbance the better,” Landau said. “All these animals have adapted to depend on these plants in the winter.” Maybe we can be smart enough to copy them.

 

 

[Source:- homesandproperty]

Unusual Wall Paneling of Wooden Parquet at Igniv Restaurant

biscuit-patricia-urquiola-listone-giordano-4

After the success of Milan Design Week – Biscuit designed by Patricia Urquiola for Listone Giordano, conquers Europe with a beautiful project in Switzerland – Igniv Restaurant at Bad Ragaz Grand Resort.

The Spanish designer Patricia Urquiola has taken her cues from the restaurant’s name – which means nest in Rhaeto-Romanic, one of Switzerland’s official languages – to mix brass, leather, golden hued table bases, and stone with an unusual wall paneling of wooden parquet by flooring company Listone Giordano. In a cozy setting, with a vaulted ceiling and an open fire, the designer created wood paneling using Biscuit that increases the sense of warmth and privacy, in a skillful mix of history and contemporary.

The duet of tradition and innovation creates eye-catching solutions that could stand alone as furnishing systems, much more than simple flooring. These collections exalt architectural design, adding innovation to the warmth and texture of wood. The collection centers on rediscovering the decorative power of parquet and the quintessentially feminine trait of softness expressed in rounded, curved blocks and a slight embossing of the surface. The patterns – regular lengthwise, inlay, mosaics or herringbone – do not differ enormously from the classic wooden floor options, but the size and the rounded tips of the wooden boards produce an entirely new look. Biscuit is made of French oak. The wooden strips can be assembled in six different patterns and used for flooring and high impact wall cladding.

 

[Source:- Interirozine]

 

How to create a year-round garden:take a tour of the ultimate ‘outdoor room’ designed by Abigail Ahern

outdoorsabigailahern2clivenichols.jpg

With a coffee table overhung with a chandelier, a snug two-seater and curvy armchairs ranged around a fireplace, as well as a kitchen and dining table, Abigail Ahern’s back garden has to be the ultimate outdoor room.

When she moved to Hackney with husband Graham 13 years ago, Ahern, an accomplished interior designer but a self-confessed non-gardener, approached the outside space with caution. “At first I did what everybody else did, and had stuff down the perimeter and nothing in the middle,” she says, “but as I became more confident, I realised the same principles I applied to inside could apply to the outside.

“One of these is that you never have everything on the perimeter. I like to design interiors so you can’t walk in a straight line from one end of the room to the other, because there’s always something in your way. It’s the difference between walking in a field, where you can see all around you which is really boring, or in a forest, where you’re not sure what’s around the next corner. That’s what I wanted to do here.”

This atmospheric retreat, with weathered decking, leafy tree canopies and stashes of logs for fires indoors and out, looks like it was built in the heart of a forest. That is, if it weren’t for the cowboy cacti — realistic fakes that Ahern sells in her Islington shop and has tucked in among the hydrangea bushes, adding a touch of Santa Fe to the patio — and the petrol blue cabin at the rear, a £100 eBay find upcycled by Graham.

The roomy patio with York stone paving looks as cosy as the living room on the other side of the huge, two-storey glass doors. Another Ahern design principle is to supersize features and furniture to make a space look larger, so naturally, as well as chandeliers in every room of the house, an outsize chandelier of tiered driftwood pieces hangs over the black lacquer coffee table.

Lighting is a game changer, indoors and out, says Ahern. “I have a problem finding outdoor lights I like, so I put indoor lights outside, and have them professionally rewired.” These include a standard lamp and a Sixties pendant shade, while the bonus of overhanging electric cable is that the mile-a-minute vine scrambles along it, creating playful garlands of green above the patio.

To the right of the patio-cum-sittingroom is the dining area, defined by an Indian zinc-topped table from Petersham Nurseries and a customised concrete kitchen from Dutch company WWOO.

“The company customised the kitchen to fit around the Big Green Egg, a barbecue cooker I’m obsessed with ever since I designed a set for a TV programme with Heston Blumenthal, who uses it all the time. You can bake on it, roast with it and it’s all temperature controlled. We put something in on a Saturday morning, slow cook it for 10 hours and come back in the evening and supper’s ready. We even cook the Christmas turkey on it.”

Playing with different textures is a big part of Ahern’s design philosophy, and is apparent in her choice of materials in both hardscape and planting. The decked garden path that leads down to the cabin is a clever fake from Millboard that resembles old, weather-worn oak timber, and is edged down either side with a deep ruff of variegated tufted grass Carex oshimensis Everest.

Pebbles — another textural contrast — are her choice of flooring on either side, giving Ahern the freedom to gradually plant both areas over time. On one side is a wall of rustling bamboo, which she planted so she could look down from her bedroom window and enjoy the constant movement, and on the opposite wall, a sheet of evergreen jasmine. “We planted about 20 tiny plants and now the scent of the flowers in summer is beautiful,” she says. “I’m mad about watering all the time to make them cover the wall.”

 

[Source:- homesandproperty]

 

Be inspired by Jonathan Adler’s iconic redesign of the Parker Palm Springs

Our first look inside designer Jonathan Adler’s first foray into public art is stylish, cool and absolutely fabulous. Along with the redesign of the Parker Palm Springs, Jonathan’s work spans myriad of categories, from pots to swanky sofas. In less than 20 years he’s opened nearly 30 stores.

The home decor expert refurbished the luxurious hotel with his signature flourishes and a vibrant and playful colour palette.

‘This hotel is a psychedelic passion project that has been part of my life for over a decade. When it came to refreshing the vibe I wanted The Parker to stay groovy but feel new.’

[Source:- IH]

Graham & Brown announces ‘Reflections’ as wallpaper of the year 2017

Fresh for the new year, Graham & Brown has unveiled Reflections as its wallpaper of the year. The contemporary design is a perfect fusion of geometric shapes, marbling and lustrous metallic shimmer – all identified as key trends for this season by the in-house design team.

Introducing the winning design, Paula Taylor, Colour & Trends Specialist says: ‘Our Wallpaper of the Year hones in on the striking simplicity of natural materials, complemented by subtle metallic embellishment and a trend-led colour palette for a contemporary graphic aesthetic that sits in any room of the home.’

More than just a name, we love how Reflections has an iridescent quality that will beautifully bounce light around a room. This thoughtful use of materials to masterfully work with light helps to balance the busy pattern, which can often make a space appear smaller making this perfect for even the smallest of rooms.

Reflections in Rose Gold, £40, Graham & Brown.

The print is also available in Copper and Silver colourways, both equally as beautiful with the same mix of marbling, concrete, wood grain and metallic effects.

The design is a bold move on from last year’s wallpaper of the year – Marbled Charcoal and Rose Gold. Let’s remind ourselves…

 
[Source:- IH]