The beauty and ecological benefits of a garden in decay

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Spring is not a moment in the garden but a sequence, a gentle unfurling of plant life that grows fuller by the day at a tempo that is almost out of sync with human perception.

One minute perennials are peeping out of the earth, and the next the soil is covered by fully grown greenery. The fall is the same way, except the movement is in reverse. With each passing week between early October and Thanksgiving, more perennials, grasses, groundcovers and the stuff of the lower layers of the garden will shrink, darken and start to lie down. Because our gaze is fixed on the changing leaf colors of the trees and shrubs, this other show occurs at a more subconscious level, but the two are related and deserve to be enjoyed together.

Where once the odd coneflower looked dried in the flower beds, other plants follow the same course, until there is a wholesale shift in the character of the garden from repletion to decline and seediness.

We are wired to see decay as rot, and rot as a threat to our well-being. So when we take stock of the autumn landscape, especially after a killing frost, our instinct is to clean it all up. This is a mistake on a number of levels.

The withering of the top growth of perennials and grasses is not a pernicious thing, but a natural part of their life cycle. They will re-sprout afresh in the spring from their crown buds. This year’s declining growth, meanwhile, is likely to be full of the very stuff of life, ripening seed.

I think – I hope – that our gardens are becoming more lavishly and dynamically planted with perennials and grasses, and with an ecological bent. If so, this fall conundrum will only become more pressing.

I see this decay as something beautiful, the way a steel panel becomes patinated with surface rust. So my approach to garden grooming in the fall is to remove obvious blight – shriveled hosta leaves, for example, along with diseased foliage – but to let anything else stand through the fall and winter as long as it isn’t an eyesore.

I particularly like the effect of the black stalks and seed heads of rudbeckias, from the knee-high black-eyed Susans to the taller giant coneflower. Composites as a rule make for handsome zombies, especially the purple coneflowers. The tall, wiry cup plant is lovely in its deterioration. Asters, too, are attractive in the dead months, especially when the fluffy, downy seeds make a break for it. Other effective perennials include amsonias, calamintha, perovskia and swamp milkweed. Need it be said, this is the time of year when all the ornamental grasses come into their own, green or brown, including the native bluestems, panicums and prairie drop seed.

If you want icing on this cake, nature provides it in the dewdrops of October and the ice crystals of November and December. The latter is a phenomenon called riming, and although the mid-Atlantic isn’t perhaps the best climatic region for this, when it happens you should take a moment to savor it. The most dramatic display of riming I saw was about four years ago in England, where a whole woodland beyond a field was frosted. It was like observing a finely crafted black-and-white art photo, but in negative. Such morning scenes, in miniature, await the untidy gardener.

There is an equally compelling argument for not weed-whacking and clearing the ornamental beds at this time of year, or the leaf litter that is obsessively blown, gathered and bagged in November. This detritus provides vital shelter and nourishment for wildlife. Doug Tallamy, author of a landmark book about ecological gardening, “Bringing Nature Home,” sees a direct link between the decline of fireflies and the modern-day fixation with leaf blowing. “Fireflies spend their entire larval life in the litter,” he said. “They are only adults for a short period.” Tallamy, a professor of entomology at the University of Delaware, is also co-author of “The Living Landscape.”

When we cut back the seed heads and stalks, we deprive birds and small mammals of seeds. “I always encourage people, if they have seed-producing plants such as black-eyed Susans, purple coneflowers or goldenrods, to leave them up because the overwintering birds really rely on them,” said Deborah Landau, an ecologist with the Maryland/D.C. chapter of the Nature Conservancy.

Neatniks also harm countless species of beneficial insects. Landau said other casualties include the egg masses of such creatures as praying mantises and spiders. The former resembles a hardened foam mass enveloping a stem; the latter looks like a string of pearls.

Many native bee species spend the winter as pupae within the pithy stems of perennials and the canes of hydrangeas, Tallamy said. “Much of the insect community is spending winter in that debris we get rid of all the time,” he said. One option for appearance’s sake is to cut back material in the front yard but leave dead top growth standing in less-visible parts of the garden, he said. Stalks and leaves that must be cut can be stored elsewhere outside, but don’t lay them down. The snow will flatten a pile and it will rot, he said.

Landau said these undisturbed beds also provide shelter for frogs and salamanders (and presumably a third amphibian, the toad).

Also, this debris is home to butterflies. I was in the Smithsonian’s Ripley Garden the other day, and it was Grand Central for monarch butterflies – adults, caterpillars and even pupae. If it stays warm, the chrysalises will hatch soon and the butterflies will head south. But other butterflies spend the winter here in their cocoons, and the pipevine plants were loaded with pipevine swallowtail caterpillars eating their way into a pupal stage, to emerge as adults next year.

“The less disturbance the better,” Landau said. “All these animals have adapted to depend on these plants in the winter.” Maybe we can be smart enough to copy them.

 

 

[Source:- homesandproperty]

Your guide to creating the perfect garden gym

Gym garden room

The number of health conscious people in the UK is on the up and commercial gyms can be incredibly busy at peak times. With costly memberships and families trying to juggle the demands of modern life, more and more are creating their own workout space at home. As garden rooms can be installed within 15-20 days, don’t usually require planning permission and can be built to a bespoke design, they are becoming popular solutions for home gyms, and over the past two years, we have noticed a rise in the number being installed.

The key to creating a productive and practical space in your garden is to carefully consider the room’s features at the design stage. This includes:

THE EQUIPMENT

When designing a gym, the first thing to consider is the equipment you are looking to install. Certain items, such as cross trainers and running machines, elevate the user and can be a real issue if you’re tall, as your head can touch the ceiling. The permitted development height of a garden room is 2.5m, however, there are no height restrictions or planning permission requirements if you simply build more than 2m from the property’s boundary. In most cases, it is beneficial to do so as higher ceilings ensure you don’t feel restricted when exercising.

As with many garden rooms, wall space is of a premium. Many customers love to have a lot of glass and it’s tempting to install wall-to-wall glass to let in as much natural light as possible, but the design and layout of the doors and windows is key to creating a functional workout space, and too many windows may limit where you can place equipment. You also need to consider privacy, especially if your garden is overlooked.

Equipment will also determine the type of flooring required. If you will be using free weights, it’s important that you select a specific rubber gym matting. Otherwise, a sturdy wood or laminate is great as they are easy to clean – especially important after an intense, sweat-inducing workout!

CHOOSING YOUR UTILITIES

Although it might not be the most exciting part of the design process, it’s really important to consider the final layout as this will determine the placement of sockets and the type of lighting and heating.

Many of the gyms we build have sockets in the floor to avoid untidy cable runs. Also, spotlights are very popular and I would always recommend considering LED lighting. Not only will this prevent your garden room from getting too hot, but it will also give you enormous savings on your energy bills. Plus, dimmers or even multiple circuits are a good option, so that certain parts of the room can be lit while others aren’t.

The other utility to consider is an entertainment system. For most, a TV and sound system are a must when working out. When designing your gym garden room, it is worth considering recessed speakers in the ceiling as this allows for more floor and wall space and will offer much better sound quality. A Bluetooth device will enable you to connect your phone or iPod so you’re able to play your favourite music through the speakers.

Also, there is the potential to incorporate plumbing if you fancy installing a bathroom or if you’re a personal trainer and are looking to use the space for clients, shower facilities could be a selling point.

THE EXTERNAL LOOK AND FEEL

A lot of the time, people focus on how they want their garden room to look on the inside and don’t consider how it will look from the outside. We encourage homeowners to really think about the external look and how this fits within their garden. The finished room is likely to be visible from the house and the last thing anyone wants to look at is a box that starkly contrasts with the rest of the garden!

Many of our customers love the idea of bi-folding doors, as they can open up directly into the garden and create the illusion of a huge space, which is great in the summer. However, it does limit the amount of wall space for gym equipment.

We also recommend landscaping and using planting to soften any straight lines in the design, this is especially good for blending the building into an established garden.

[Source:- Housebeautiful]

How to take care of your orangery, conservatory and garden room this winter

Orangeries - Auburn Hill

The winter months are some of the most exciting and yearned for; crisp country walks, cosy log fires and chunky blankets. But if you are lucky enough to have a conservatory, orangery or garden room, the winter season can pose a threat.

In order to be able to continue to use this room to appreciate the pink winter sunsets and robins on the lawn, you must be prepared to take several steps. Paul Matthews, managing director at Auburn Hill, explains exactly what you need to do:

1. GUTTERING AND DRAINAGE

The guttering and downspouts that many orangeries and conservatories possess are known to become blocked in both the autumn and winter months, as the leaves fall and the weather becomes unfavourable with lashings of wind and rain.

Clearing them of debris and leaves is not going to be the highlight of your year, but it’s going to pay off long term. If guttering becomes blocked during the wet weather, gutters can leak, and this inherently leads to internal damp and mould growth – far from ideal at any time of the year!

By doing this, you also have the opportunity to identify any part of the guttering that is old, tired and a little worse for wear, or if it is damaged. If this is the case, the problems should be replaced or repaired immediately before the water can infiltrate the brickwork.

While dry days are ideal for this chore, frosty days also make it a little easier – just make sure you have someone with you to ensure accidents don’t occur while using a ladder.

2. TREES AND SHRUBBERY

As the temperatures plummet and the air gets damp – we would rather retreat indoors to practise hygge rather than continue cutting the lawn and preening trees and bushes. But it’s incredibly important that you make trimming your garden a priority if it’s home to the aforementioned flora.

As the wind is whipping around your garden, hearing next door’s gate being thrown around should be your biggest worry – not the branches from your Japanese cherry tree about to crack the glazing in your orangery.

Trees, hedges and bushes should be trimmed right back to prevent them causing damage to your orangery or conservatory. Branches that are dead or weak should be removed completely as these pose the biggest threat to your home extension.

[Source:- Housebeautiful]

How to create the perfect winter garden wonderland

Lantern in a winter garden

The festive season may be here but don’t neglect your outside space. While you’re busy beautifying your home and getting your tree ready, you can also create a magical space in your garden.

In fact, all it takes is a little planning and activity. Here, garden specialists Oeco Garden Rooms give their tips on creating the perfect winter garden wonderland.

1. GARDEN LAYOUT

Having the right garden layout from the get go is the most important thing, not only for the summer months when the flowers are in bloom but also the winter as the plants start to die off; this is where you will see the bare bones of the garden and if it is not laid out properly it can look gloomy and untidy.

Wall gardens, hedges and raised flower beds are all great ways of adding structure to the garden, providing designated areas for different activities and can be repurposed for different times of the year.

2. ADD SEASONAL COLOURS TO YOUR GARDEN

Adding seasonal colours such as red and white will make the garden more inviting and flowers such as Hellebores are a great choice. These flowers, sometimes known as the Christmas rose are pastel pink and white in colour and produce big leaves that fill the space in the garden. They flower for a long time as well, generally lasting between late winter and early spring.

Another white flower to consider is Clematis Jingle Bells; these flowers have a bold white colour and typically flower from December to January. Clematis Jingle Bells will need some pruning to keep the size down as they can grow up to five metres high.

Fir trees are the quintessential winter wonderland accessory especially when it snows; they are evergreen and require very little maintenance, but be sure to choose a small species of fir tree as some can grow up to 80 feet tall.

For a festive touch in your garden, why not opt for a holly tree. Make sure that you get a male bush are these are the ones that produce those signature red berries. For those who do not have the space for a Holly tree, Cotoneaster horizontal is or Pyracantha are a great choice for adding a pop of colour to the garden.

3. THE WINTER SCENT

While the inside of the house smells of cinnamon, spices and oranges to evoke the festive spirit, the garden is largely forgotten, but there are various ways of creating the sweet smell of winter in the garden with scented flowers.

Planting Witch Hazel is a great choice to add a wintery scent to the garden; its large yellow flowers release a delicious scent of liquorice into the air. Winter honeysuckle is also a good choice, producing a lemony-fresh scent.

For those who want an evergreen shrub that has little maintenance then Sarcococca is the perfect fit. Commonly known as the Christmas Box or Sweet Box, Sarcococca produces small white flowers with a lush, leathery foliage and best of all it exudes a fragrant honey scent during the winter.

4. DECORATE YOUR WONDERLAND

Your winter garden wonderland wouldn’t be complete without some decoration. Fairy lights and lanterns are a great way of creating light in an outdoor space and can be hung on trees, draped over bushes or hung from outdoor structures like sheds, garden rooms and decking.

For those on a budget, there are plenty of things to do that won’t cost a lot of money including tying festive ribbons to tree branches, hanging wreaths around the garden and decorating trees with baubles and tinsel.

5. BUILD A FIRE PIT

Many people give the garden a miss during the winter months because of the cold, but adding a heat source is easy and cheap and provides an outdoor space that can be used all year round. Patio heaters and chimera’s are a great way of adding heat to the garden, and building your own fire pit is a cheap way for the whole family to gather around and enjoy.

6. ATTRACT ROBINS TO YOUR GARDEN

If there is one bird that evokes a winter wonderland, then it’s a robin redbreast. These majestic birds are strongly associated with Christmas, taking a starring role in many festive cards since the mid-19th century.

Robins will often come when other birds are around, so make sure that you put plenty of food out for all the birds. Black sunflower seeds and seed balls are great for attracting various species of birds, but be sure to avoid dried lentils as only certain birds can eat them. Robins are also fond of crushed nuts so placing some on a bird table is sure to get them knocking.

[Source:- Housebeautiful]

Make your garden wildlife-friendly this winter

During the colder months your outdoor space can be a safe haven for birds, insects and hedgehogs. 

Follow these simple tips to make your garden wildlife friendly.

For hibernating wildlife, food isn’t so important once winter has set in but for birds the food you put out can be a lifeline, especially as the season goes on and berries are increasingly in short supply. Try to put food out in the same place every day so the birds get to know where to come.

On sunny days at the end of autumn and beginning of spring you will see bees around, so late and very early-flowering plants are a real help. Ivy is in flower at this time of year and bulbs, which you can plant now, are a good source of food for bees early in the spring – fritillaries, crocus and snowdrops can all be buzzing with bees on a sunny day.

Wildlife homes such as bee houses are widely available to buy, but one of the best ways to offer protection, whether it’s for bees or hedgehogs, is to create habitats in the sunniest, most sheltered spot you can find.

  • A stack of bricks and pots will provide a home for toads and newts.
  • Sticks and logs are great for hedgehogs and insects.
  • Bees in particular love old wood with lots of little hidey-holes, left in a sunny place.
  • And leaves piled up will be great for hedgehogs, frogs and toads.

DO NOT DISTURB

Whether it’s not raking up leaves to make a bonfire, or foregoing cutting down the perennials in December, the best thing you can do for wildlife once the garden is set, is to leave it all undisturbed until well into the spring. It’s not just the leaves in the flowerbeds or the old flower stems that will provide food and shelter, even the corners of a shed may have butterflies overwintering, or a sunny wall may be harbouring bees or ladybirds.

There’s one exception as we go in to early winter, look out for small, under 650g, hedgehogs, especially if you see them out in the daytime. These are young and will not survive winter without help. If you find one call your local hedgehog rescue for advice.

[Source:- Housebeautiful]

4 reasons why you should plan a garden redesign in winter

View of landscaped garden through open door

Often it’s in the height of summer – when the sun is beaming down and plants are blossoming – that we think about how we want to improve our garden. As we’re sitting outside, we can see what needs doing and what changes we want to make. 

But award-winning garden designer, Michael John McGarr of Warnes McGarr & Co, recommends planning ahead and actually booking in any garden design and landscaping work in winter.

Here are four reasons why:

1. IT’S LESS DISTURBANCE TO YOU AND THE FAMILY

Ensure you get to use your garden in the summer, because if it’s being landscaped, you definitely won’t be able to use your outdoor space. It’s unlikely you’ll be sitting outside in the sun that much in late autumn and through into winter, so it’s the perfect time to begin a redesign.

2. IT’S EASIER FOR YOUR GARDEN DESIGN TEAM

It’s much easier for your garden team to work with a garden when it’s not in full growth mode in the summer. Plants and shrubs will be dying back for the winter, and weeds won’t be growing voraciously. Generally, when there’s less foliage and greenery, it makes your landscapers’ job much easier!

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3. IT’S LESS DISTURBANCE TO WILDLIFE

It’s hard to be a garden designer and not have a love for wildlife and its place in the garden. It’s much better to do a big garden project over the winter when there’s not as much wildlife out and about to disturb.

4. IT’LL PROTECT YOUR PLANTS IN THE LONG-TERM

It’s much better to move and relocate plants and shrubs over the winter when they aren’t growing or flowering. You probably won’t want to keep every single plant, but it’s much kinder to those that you really do want to keep to be dug up and moved around in the colder months.

[Source:- Housebeautiful]

Garden photography tips for autumn and winter

Frosty leaves in the garden in autumn

We know its cold outside but whipping out your camera and capturing the beauty of wildlife is as good a reason as any to get outdoors and into your garden.

Marianne Majerus, a world-renowned garden photographer and RHS Photographic Competition 2017 judge, provides her top photography tips for creating great-quality images that you’ll be proud of – they could even make great wall art for your home!

1. SPOT SPIDER WEBS

Before you decide to sweep spider webs away this season, consider incorporating them into your photographs, as they can add a sense of mystery. This is especially so at dawn on sunny autumn days, when flowers and foliage will be decorated by dew and cobwebs. If there is little or no wind you will have time to compose your images and won’t have to change aperture to compensate for subject movement. When photographing spider webs try experimenting by including more details in the frame, in order to add context, or capturing the moment a spider is visible to add a focal point.

2. GET CREATIVE WITH SEASONAL FRUIT

Keep your eyes peeled for seasonal fruit and berries, which might make for great close-up shots and could even be consumed afterwards. Wild berries in particular could be an inspiring subject matter, with their voluptuous forms and the strong colour contrast between the leaves and the fruit, which can add dramatic tension to photographs. Including more detail such as the path where they are found and their surroundings can help add a story to your photograph. Autumnal forests can have a magical ambience that can produce almost fairytale-like images.

3. PLAY WITH AUTUMN LIGHT

Make the most of the beautiful misty morning light which gives this season its character. To avoid camera shake when the light is low, try propping the camera against a tree trunk or alter your ISO rating to achieve sharper images. As with most photography, the nature and direction of light falling on a subject is crucial. Soft sidelighting will give good modeling while keeping shadows delicate, whereas stronger, low-angled sidelighting is very good for emphasising the texture or bark and leaves.

4. LOOK OUT FOR BACKLIT LEAVES

Backlit leaves, the colours and cell structure of which are enhanced by the sun, can offer great subject matter and can create strong graphic images. When photographing close-up flowers or leaves, do not fixate on the subject to the extent that you forget the background. Try using the depth-of-field preview lever on your camera to see what is visible behind your subject and consider using a larger aperture to throw the background out of focus. Try moving around a subject to find a pleasing background.

5. DON’T SPOIL THE LAWN

When outdoors, it is important to make sure you don’t spoil the delicate dew on the lawn by walking over it before a photograph is taken. Try to plan your shots before leaving footprints on the lawn. Remember to look out for flowers and plants that are a bit different or that have something distinctive about them. Autumn is not the time to look for perfection: imperfect blooms and seedheads can be beautiful in this melancholic season.

6. DISCOVER GARDEN WILDLIFE

Mild autumn weather can offer an ideal opportunity to seek out garden wildlife including hedgehogs, birds and insects to create winning images. While attracting these creatures to your garden can sometimes be challenging, especially in an urban environment, there are some things you could do. Try sprinkling food such as seeds, nuts and fruit on designated patches of grass or use feeders, which work particularly well for birds. Attract hedgehogs by leaving a small gap in your garden fence to allow them to get in and out of the garden with ease. Garden ponds can attract a wide variety of amphibians and frogs. Once you find your subject, start experimenting with staging a photo by adding one or two random objects to the frame, such as a garden glove, and watching how they interact.

[Source:- Housebeautiful]

Garden Lamp of Metal and Glass by Christian Piccolo

High profile shapes, squared lines for sceneries with great identity. Inspired by toy soldiers game, Game is a garden lamp with a material mark and strongly modern. A surprising volume, a contemporary artwork that enchants for its unique inclination and squared shapes.

garden-lamp

minimal-extremely-functional-lamp

This collection fits easily into private and contract spaces, thanks to the perfect balance of shape, material and precision of details. Game stands out for its minimal and extremely functional language. Modernity and innovation are combined perfectly in this lamp of metal and glass.

game-garden-lamp

[Source:- Interiorzine]

How to attract bees to your garden

bees

Bees are key pollinators and their numbers are in decline. Without a healthy population there are serious implications for many garden plants and food crops. Sharon Jervis, the founder of giftware retailer Beefayre, offers advice on how to attract bees to your garden.

Plant lots of flowers of different colours and shapes. Blue, white, violet, purple and yellow are all particularly attractive to bees. The more diverse a collection the better. It’s important to have a variety of plants flowering throughout the growing season.

Pick excellent pollinator-friendly plants like lavender – a lavender bed would make a great addition in any garden for bees and other pollinators for example butterflies. Borage, comfrey, and native wildflowers are also great choices. Research has shown that native flowers are more attractive to bees than exotic non-native flowers.

Grow a little herb garden, many bee species are fond of herb flowers.

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Planting flowers in clumps as oppose to singly will attract more bees. Clumps also provide much needed cover and food for butterfly larvae.

Choose a selection of crocus bulbs to plant in the autumn, as these are early spring flowering and important for bees that are waking up and needing energy. Ivy flowers provide a pollen source towards the end of the year.

Leave the dandelions! Dandelion pollen is very rich in fats, which are a very important energy source for bees and other pollinators. Allowing some of your garden to grow a little wild so clover and other flowers can bloom is another great effortless assistance to bees you can make.

Buy solitary bee nesting boxes, or alternatively make your own, to provide a nesting habitat. Fix these on a south facing wall where you can see them. A few bird nest boxes are also a good idea as these will be readily colonised by tree bumblebees.

Provide water when it warms up a bit, bees will appreciate a bird bath or somewhere where a little rain water can collect.

Do not use pesticides of any kind in your garden. There are harm free alternatives that can be used instead.

Consider beekeeping as a hobby! The British Bee Keepers Association run courses all over the country.

bees-beehive-garden
[Source:- HB]

How to grow the perfect tree for your garden

how-to-grow-a-tree

A tree will bring year-round interest and colour into even the smallest garden – but consider how big it will eventually become.

WHICH TREE TO CHOOSE

  • If you’d prefer a tree that doesn’t need any pruning, and grows to no more than about 3m tall, look at varieties that cross over between trees and shrubs. Small varieties of Japanese maple such as Acer palmatum ‘Garnet’ fit this bill.
  • If you’re prepared to prune after a few years, then you’ll have more options. You could consider the Cercis canadensis ‘Forest Pansy’ with its lovely dark purple leaves, or the Juneberry.
  • Unless you have a very big garden, steer clear of quick-growing trees such as poplars and Leylandii. Also consider the root run of some types. For example, eucalyptus, even when pruned regularly, sends roots out a long way and blossom trees and poplars have roots very close to the surface, which means they can lift paths and ruin lawns.
tree-planted-next-to-bench

WHERE TO PLANT

  • Think about what you want the tree for. If it’s to screen, it needs to be positioned carefully. Trees are difficult to move so it’s worth imagining a tree in different spots in the garden before planting. A good tip is to take a picture from where you need the screening and sketch in the tree to the right size to gauge the effect.
  • Always position away from the house, as roots can affect foundations by sucking water out of the soil. Some types of soil are more susceptible than others to problems. For instance, clay soil shrinks a great deal when it becomes dry and that can shift foundations.
  • The best place to plant is at the boundary, to provide screening from neighbours. Deciduous trees are excellent as they create a barrier and shade in the summer when you’re out in the garden, but they lose their leaves in winter, letting light filter through the branches.
  • If you are planting a tree to give height and structure to your outside space, perhaps to form an arch over a path or to create a barrier halfway down the garden, you could keep it in a pot. That way, as long as you prune it carefully and regularly, you need never worry about where the roots are going.
tree-in-pot

MORE FROM HOUSEBEAUTIFUL

FRUIT TREES

Usually, fruit trees are grafted on to a different stem, so the top, which determines what the fruit is like, is attached to a specially selected stem that will keep the whole plant small. They also come fan-trained for placing against a warm wall, or as cordons – just one main stem that again can be tied up to a wall. Always buy self-fertile ones, so the flowers will result in fruit.

YEAR-ROUND INTEREST

With fruit you also get different seasons of interest – from blossom in the spring to fruit in the autumn, while the shapes of tree give structural interest through the winter. This so important in a small garden because as you’ll be looking at these trees all year round, they need to be worth it! Juneberry has strong all-year interest, with white flowers in early spring, reddish-purple berries in summer and wonderful orange-red leaves in autumn. Or plant trees with interesting bark such as the white-stemmed silver birch or the rich red shining bark of Prunus serrula. Although this one grows eventually to 8m, it does so quite slowly.

HOW TO PLANT

  • Dig a hole a wider and a little deeper than the roots of your tree. Loosen the soil around the roots.
  • Put the tree in the hole and check the depth. Look for the mark on the trunk that shows where it originally grew above ground. This should be level with the top of the soil. If a tree is not deep enough the roots above ground will die.
  • Fill the hole around with soil while holding the tree upright.
  • Press the soil down onto the roots. Don’t compact the soil as this will stop water and air circulating but make sure the tree is steady.
  • Water well.
  • Support with a stake, if necessary.

THE TOP 10 TREES FOR SMALL SPACES​

  1. Sorbus ‘Joseph Rock’, a white flower mountain ash, which grows to 10m.
  2. Prunus serrula, a cherry with good autumn colour. It can reach 8m.
  3. Crataegus persimilis ‘Prunifolia’, which matures to a height of 8m.
  4. Betula albosinensis, this tree has a peeling bark and may top 12m.
  5. Amelanchier x grandiflora ‘Ballerina’ can advance to 6m.
  6. Acer palmatum ‘Garnet’ has a delicate weeping shape. It grows to 1.5m.
  7. Arbutus unedo, a slow-growing evergreen tree or large shrub that can reach 8m.
  8. Magnolia × loebneri ‘Merrill’ has pale pink star-shaped flowers in spring and may reach 8m.
  9. Euonymus europaeus ‘Red Cascade’ can be grown in a container and will top 3m.
  10. Prunus‘Kursar’, a dwarf flowering cherry that grows to 8m.

[Source:- HB]